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IB worth it?

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Okay hi guys!

I'm 14 yrs old and I'm in grade 10 pre bac in Canada and will be going into Year 1 of IB next year. I was just wondering if IB is actually worth it? I've heard that IB is only beneficial if you get high grades, and universities don't really care too much. Can someone clarify things? Please and thank you! :eek::question::question::question:

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It really depends on what your other options are, and where and what you want to study once you finish highschool.

The IB is a lot of hard work and if you're not determined from the really beginning I wouldn't recommend it honestly. It is, however, very rewarding as most universities in the world recognise the IB and understand it is a difficult program so it opens many doors. It is also rewarding on the more personal level - although some of the things we have to do is total BS (like following the IB learner profile) most of the "extra curricular" (yet mandatory) work, such as CAS and ToK, is really interesting and helps you develop as a person, regardless of how much you hate whilst doing it (though of course, doing it with a positive attitude is even more beneficial).

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Yes, I agree completely with maroctam. The IB can be really really hard, especially if you're not all that well-rounded. However, it really challenges those who are up to it and pushes you to develop as a person.

Remember, it requires a lot of dedication and hard work! It will definitely stress you out, but you can be prepared.

Ask yourself: do I want to push myself? Do I enjoy languages, maths and sciences? (although, you can do DT or sth to avoid science in most schools) Do I have the motivation?

To be honest, I'm struggling a little. But, in the end (MAY!!) I know it will be sooo worth it and very rewarding. Also, it really really prepares you for university (in the UK at least, I don't know about US)

Anyway, good luck!

Edited by under-cover

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A lot depends on the university you want to go to. Do some digging! Some universities will accept you even if you did poorly in the program, just because you were in IB. Others don't really see it as special. Also, IB is a very difficult program, and you need to be willing to dedicate the majority of your next two years to your studies. However, I've seen that it is possible for anyone, if you're willing to put in the right effort. Good Luck!

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Although the IB has been challenging, I don't regret it for one minute. It has most certainly been the best choice that I could have made; especially when compared to my local Australian system which ranks you based on where you sit in comparison to everyone else in the state, which is pretty intimidating! But I feel that the IB rewards you well, and the score converts nicely into most local systems- particularly in Australia where having done the IB looks great.

I am in the middle of exams right now, and in two weeks today I will have finished! So when you ask has it been worth it, I say yes, yes, yes. Although I'm under heaps of stress right now, you just find a way to manage. Despite sounding cliche, I have grown so much as a person doing the IB, and the local and international community is just so supportive and fantastic. As my school has less than 50 IB students, we have grown super close. The research skills that I have gained doing more IAs than I care to count (probably around 15) and an Extended Essay are invaluable, and despite these processes being long and taking up all my holidays, these are skills that I will be able to take with me to university next year, and the rest of my life. Also IB teaches you how to study

If you are hard-working and determined, then it's a great course. Don't get me wrong, it's the hardest thing I have ever done. You need to be committed and organised. Because exams seem so far away from when you start it's super easy to just think, oh, I'll do notes for that topic later. Come exam time, you don't want to have to be still organising notes and summary cards etc. So if you want to do well you have to be willing to put the work in. The IB is a marathon, not a sprint. You can't work too hard, too fast or you will burn out and fall back; losing the motivation come exam time. It might seem silly after doing so much work, but it's so easy to feel like you are so over the work that you just want to give up. But you also can't walk the marathon and expect to win. So, find somewhere in between. Be consistent. Do the same level of work in IB1 and IB2. Set yourself your own 'homework.' Aim to have completed full notes and summary cards after you have done every topic so that they are all ready when you have to do your exams. Ultimately it's your decision, but make sure that you are fully committed before you decide :)

Edited by iblyf
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If you decide to do it, make sure not to slack off AT ALL! The grades you make in you high school IB classes will be transferred into your college GPA, so if you have a crummy two years of IB, you college GPA will suck! Just keep that in mind, because I am a senior almost done with the program and I am wishing I would have worked a little bit harder my junior year so that I wouldn't have anything to worry about when I get into college!

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Well, I dropped out of the IB program, however, you need inquiries from everybody, not just students who are "silly" for the IB program. Honestly, I believe that the worthiness of the IB program typically varies in terms of what school you are going to attend in order to take IB-oriented courses. I actually remotely found out about the program. I attended a smaller school, West Holmes High School, that had relations with the Tri-County ESC. This ESC actually offers the IB program to those smaller schools by offering the program at Wooster High School. I was actually the only individual from my school to attempt the IB program due to the fact that the PSEOP is promoted at my school. The IB program is not promoted at all. The nearest college that offers the PSEOP is only 7 miles (10 minutes) away from their local school, therefore, it appears to be more feasible than the IB program. The IB program, for most students in that area, would be about 30 minutes away. In my case, it was sometimes 1 or 2 hours. So, distance is definitely a factor that you would want to consider. Another consideration would be the factor of flexibility. Flexibility would be a factor that you would most certainly want to check. At my former school that offered IB, we were forced to take what they wanted us to take. They (TCIA & Wooster High School) do not offer the partial program at this time, therefore you will be required to take IB Spanish, IB Math, IB Chemisty, IB Biology, ToK, IB History of the Americas & IB English. Optionally, you could also potentially take IB Physics. Other than that, you have absolutely no flexibility. The PSEOP offers quite a bit of flexibility, actually. [That] would be in regards to time and scheduling! It would just be based on what you would want to do with your future. If you want to become a professor in the circle of core-oriented academics, then I would suggest the IB program only due to the fact it only offers core academics. If you have a different interest, such as Computer Science or Instrumental Music, then I would suggest the PSEOP. With the PSEOP, you will actually earn college credits for free. You do not have to become extremely nervous over taking a big exam after two years in order to learn that you worked toward absolutely nothing! Just for the humor of it all, I called the GWU in Washington, D.C. to be told that they only accept the course as a college credit in the case that you would score a seven. Plus, you can also choose what college you would like to attend that your local or open school has to offer. Another alternative to check would be AP. Advanced Placement appears to be remotely relevant in regards the IB program. Although it does not retain an "international spin" on its courses, you are still required to score, in most cases for college, a "3/5" or higher on the exams in order to receive college credit to bypass introductory classes in college. Overall, it is totally up to you in regards to what you decide to do with your academics. Be dedicated in regards to what you would like to do. I will tell you that if you do choose to go through with the IB program, then at least assume staying there in order to finish the year before dropping the program. If you drop after the first two weeks of being in the IB program, then you are going to find yourself in an academic struggle to return to taking AP or normal courses. Some schools will actually force you to have no other option other than to complete the rest of the academic year on the internet-based system through the school(s) in order to complete the rest of your year, therefore, be sure that what you choose to do would be exactly what you would like to do for approximately an entire academic-oriented year. Good luck in regards to your decisions!

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I have many questions regarding the IB program and its post-high school value:

1. Do colleges take IB into consideration for credit?

2. Do colleges really look at your course rigor?

3. Is IB worth the time I will spend in it?

please pm me with answers

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I have applied to some Canadian universities and gotten an offer of admission from one (I think it's a conditional offer so I have to match my current predicted grades or get higher). I think the IB Diploma is very valuable, if you can get the score needed to get into your desired university. Also, IB is really interesting and fun but at times extremely stressful. Picking the right classes and developing good study habits is crucial. Good luck with whatever decision you make.

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If you want to become a professor in the circle of core-oriented academics, then I would suggest the IB program only due to the fact it only offers core academics. If you have a different interest, such as Computer Science or Instrumental Music, then I would suggest the PSEOP.

There are subjects IB computer Science and IB Music. There are a wide variety of IB subjects that you can take (depends on the school tough). Also IB requires extracurricular activities through CAS.

Edited by r1111

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I really hate it and I'm only taking it because I want to apply to UK or Europe. I also hate the "extracurricular activites" (more like mandatory) The C(visual arts!) and A part of the CAS is good but the S part, isn't social service originally meant to be punishment for criminals? Also TOK..ugh I hate academics even through I have good grades. My idea of fun is watching TV, listening to music or getting wasted with my friends (which is why I'm grounded today..) I'm studying only because to get to a good university/earn money when I graduate etc. I also hate the all-rounded student part of the IB. Group 1 and 2 subjects are just a big HOW ABOUT NO for me. I would just quit the IB now but my parents don't let me transfer to an A-Level school (only 3 subjects of your choice, no EE , yearly examinations etc.) I am the perfect example of a student who isn't suited to the IB. Just don't be like me if you want to succeed at IB.

If you are the oppposite of me , (all-rounded, actually enjoy academics etc) and IB suits your college choices, go for it.

I'm sorry but I have to flat out disagree with you about service being only for criminal punishment. Although maybe originally it was meant to be a punishment way back in old times, today you will find many people who do service for no reason other than to want to help or give back to their communities. I could have stopped at my 50 hour service requirement, but I ended up turning in over 600 hours of service by the time I finished IB. Service is doing more than just hour counting and punishment. Service is doing something that is bigger than yourself, giving up your time for no monetary gain or benefit. I hate that people see it as an unfair requirement in the IB. Service is a great way of helping others and if you can't see that, I'm sorry. You don't have to go volunteer in a homeless shelter if that's not what you like to do. My service was focused primarily around teaching: helping out in lower-income elementary schools to improve young children's ability to read and write in English so that maybe when they get to high school they won't be left back and feel compelled to drop out and can be productive members of society, and teaching/promoting science to the general public with the hopes that maybe I'm inspiring some kid to have an educational goal in life that many people don't do because it's "hard" or "nerdy" or to show some family that the Earth really is a cool place to be and you shouldn't just dump all sorts of toxic things into the oceans. To me at least, that's more important and fun than getting wasted each weekend and sitting on my butt watching TV. Having a selfish "well I want to watch TV" attitude isn't good for anyone. I hope you can see that.

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I really hate it and I'm only taking it because I want to apply to UK or Europe. I also hate the "extracurricular activites" (more like mandatory) The C(visual arts!) and A part of the CAS is good but the S part, isn't social service originally meant to be punishment for criminals?

Some people actually like helping others and don't do so as a punishment. It's called being a good person. Try it.

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