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There are several universities in the US where they give credits to the students who have taken some subjects in Higher level. I am going to apply for Aerospace engineering, do you think that I would be able to skip some classes due to HL Maths, Hl Chemistry and SL Physics?

Is physics SL good enough for an engineering career?

Edited by Mikhael

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There are several universities in the US where they give credits to the students who have taken some subjects in Higher level. I am going to apply for Aerospace engineering, do you think that I would be able to skip some classes due to HL Maths, Hl Chemistry and SL Physics?

Is physics SL good enough for an engineering career?

Yes you should be able to skip some of the introductory classes with HL math and HL chemistry. Typically you need a score of 5 to do this, but I have seen some schools requiring at least a 4 (my school does this) and some unfortunately require as high as 6! Engineering math sequences in the US typically begin with Calculus 1, which is single variable differential calculus and some single variable integration. Math HL covers that, along with some more integration techniques. You will probably start in at least a second semester calculus class, if not a third semester calculus class which is typically multivariable calculus. Aerospace engineering isn't heavy in chemistry but you may be required to take a class in it, since it's usually a subset of a school's mechanical engineering department and mechanical engineering usually has a chemistry requirement. HL chemistry typically covers the first general chemistry course or two, so you should be good here with HL chemistry.

I entered university not even having ever taken physics before! My school didn't offer IB physics, and the courses I took made it impossible to take a non-IB physics course like AP physics B or C. Imagine that challenge :P SL physics will be a good start and you will have seen most of the main concepts you do in your first year (conservation of energy, momentum, waves, thermodynamics, etc). Ideally HL is best, but having some physics is better than none at all. You'll be taking calculus-based physics in university whereas IB's physics, even at HL, is algebra based physics, but since calculus was invented to explain physics, the stuff you'll be doing will be straightforward and intuitive. Plus, in the first few physics classes (especially intro ones) you don't use much more than simple calculus like taking a derivative. It's not until you get into upper level engineering classes that you touch the crazy physics. You will be okay :)

Note some top engineering schools might not like not seeing HL physics or something equivalent, but usually having some physics is fine for the majority of engineering programs. Sometimes you can even get away with not having it as long as you have chemistry and lots of math.

Edited by Emmi
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There are several universities in the US where they give credits to the students who have taken some subjects in Higher level. I am going to apply for Aerospace engineering, do you think that I would be able to skip some classes due to HL Maths, Hl Chemistry and SL Physics?

Is physics SL good enough for an engineering career?

Yes you should be able to skip some of the introductory classes with HL math and HL chemistry. Typically you need a score of 5 to do this, but I have seen some schools requiring at least a 4 (my school does this) and some unfortunately require as high as 6! Engineering math sequences in the US typically begin with Calculus 1, which is single variable differential calculus and some single variable integration. Math HL covers that, along with some more integration techniques. You will probably start in at least a second semester calculus class, if not a third semester calculus class which is typically multivariable calculus. Aerospace engineering isn't heavy in chemistry but you may be required to take a class in it, since it's usually a subset of a school's mechanical engineering department and mechanical engineering usually has a chemistry requirement. HL chemistry typically covers the first general chemistry course or two, so you should be good here with HL chemistry.

I entered university not even having ever taken physics before! My school didn't offer IB physics, and the courses I took made it impossible to take a non-IB physics course like AP physics B or C. Imagine that challenge :P SL physics will be a good start and you will have seen most of the main concepts you do in your first year (conservation of energy, momentum, waves, thermodynamics, etc). Ideally HL is best, but having some physics is better than none at all. You'll be taking calculus-based physics in university whereas IB's physics, even at HL, is algebra based physics, but since calculus was invented to explain physics, the stuff you'll be doing will be straightforward and intuitive. Plus, in the first few physics classes (especially intro ones) you don't use much more than simple calculus like taking a derivative. It's not until you get into upper level engineering classes that you touch the crazy physics. You will be okay :)

Note some top engineering schools might not like not seeing HL physics or something equivalent, but usually having some physics is fine for the majority of engineering programs. Sometimes you can even get away with not having it as long as you have chemistry and lots of math.

Thank you! wow, I know now what I can expect in the US. Calculus is one of my strongest sides in Maths so I should be fine. The concepts you mentioned are covered in option and the core in SL physics so I would be fine there as well.

What is concerning me is " It's not until you get into upper level engineering classes that you touch the crazy physics". Ah... this scares me actually.

Btw, how hard is actually to change from one engineering major to another? I might change to mechanical and I am aware of that mechanical and aerospace have almost the same curriculum until the end of third year.

Again, Thank you <3

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Thank you! wow, I know now what I can expect in the US. Calculus is one of my strongest sides in Maths so I should be fine. The concepts you mentioned are covered in option and the core in SL physics so I would be fine there as well.

What is concerning me is " It's not until you get into upper level engineering classes that you touch the crazy physics". Ah... this scares me actually.

Btw, how hard is actually to change from one engineering major to another? I might change to mechanical and I am aware of that mechanical and aerospace have almost the same curriculum until the end of third year.

Again, Thank you <3

Don't worry about the upper level engineering courses yet, by the time you get there you will have all the math you need to know and it's mostly just applying basic concepts to more advanced problems. I remember early on in my first chemistry class the professor showed me the work for a upper level thermodynamics class, now that was scary! Now that I've taken multivariable calculus at least I recognize most of the symbols used in the problem :lol:

The difficulty in changing majors depends on how similar the curricula are. At my school, although aerospace and mechanical are kind of in the same department and are similar, applications to each engineering major requires a separate application (you apply to either aerospace or mechanical) and the curriculum starts to change in the second year. Some engineering majors are pretty much the same barring a few classes, for example the difference between electrical engineering and computer engineering is usually just a few electives. If you switch early enough and the majors are similar you avoid most of the problems with having to take prerequisites or take certain classes just to catch up.

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Engineering Thread! :D

Ok, so i am planning to study Mechanical engineering in the US. I was planning on studying Bio-medical engineering, so i took biology SL.

Later on this year, i decided to switch to Mechanical as it is a safer bet, and i can always go to graduate school for Bio-medical.

Is taking biology instead of Chemistry going have a negative impact on my application/admissions?

Thanks in advance,

-Fiz

Edited by Fiz

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Engineering Thread! :D

Ok, so i am planning to study Mechanical engineering in the US. I was planning on studying Bio-medical engineering, so i took biology SL.

Later on this year, i decided to switch to Mechanical as it is a safer bet, and i can always go to graduate school for Bio-medical.

Is taking biology instead of Chemistry going have a negative impact on my application/admissions?

Thanks in advance,

-Fiz

I doubt it. You should be fine.

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Hi,

I'm just about to start Year 11 and was wondering if my subjects are fine to study engineering?

Predominantly in countries like England, USA, Canada, Austria and Switzerland?

-HL Physics

-HL Business Management

-HL English

-SL Maths

-SL Chemistry

-Ab initio Spanish

I was planning to do HL Film instead of Chemistry, but after investigating about some Uni's it seems I need Chemistry.

Also, what are some of the required IB scores like?

Thanks :D

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Hello, I am a 12th grade and wonder if my subjects are good to study chemical engineering?

Primarily in Australia's top unis like University of Queensland and University of Melbourne

-HL Chemistry

-HL Business Management

-HL Mandarin

-SL Maths

-SL Physics

-SL Language and Literature

If anyone could provide information of how chemical engineering courses work, it will be great

Thanks :)

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I don't really know too much about how Australian unis go as far as requirements go, although I do understand that they have some sort of points score/ATAR thing where your IB score gets converted to a score out of 100 and you need a certain score to get in, so the higher your IB score, the better. If they have some sort of entry requirements, you need to meet them as well.

I'm confused why you're not taking HL math and physics. Is this because your school doesn't offer them? If that's the case, SL is better than nothing, as long as the unis you want to go to understand that if there's a requirement for HL. I wouldn't take HL business, it's pointless for engineering.

Chemical engineering courses can vary from school to school. At my school, you start as a pre-major and take a bunch of prerequisites like general chemistry and math and a fundamentals of engineering course and apply to get into the major. If you get in (basically if you make A's and B's in everything you're good) then you take the actual chemical engineering classes. At some schools you begin in the major right away.

A typical curriculum has basic classes like math (calculus, differential equations, and linear algebra), physics (mechanics + electricity/magnetism/waves), and chemistry (general chemistry like the IB offers, organic chemistry, and sometimes physical chemistry), and then engineering courses like separations, unit operations, mass transport, thermodynamics, fluid dynamics, and reactor design. You might also have a capstone course, which is basically a huge design project based on everything you've learned, and is typically taken at the very end of the curriculum.

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Hey there,

I am interested in maybe going into engineering (but still not sure which one... either Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Mechanical/Aerospace Engineering

Systems Engineering).

The subjects I'm going to take in the IB: HL Math, HL Physics, HL Economics, SL Chemistry, SL English A (Lang)Lit, SL German A LangLit. I reckon that my subject choices are sort of good for engineering (Maths HL, Physics HL)...

Questions:

1) For chemical engineering, do you need Chemistry HL? I know that the requirements differ from country to country and uni to uni... but in general?

2) What sort of jobs can you pursue after getting your XYZ engineering degree?

Thanks :)

1. Yes. Aim to take HL chemistry if you want to do chemical engineering. The other engineering disciplines you listed aren't really chemistry-based. Civil and mechanical engineering usually require a little chemistry, but none at the level or amount that chemical engineering does. SL chem is okay if you want to take it, but don't feel compelled to take it.

2. You can literally do anything with an engineering degree. Certain disciplines usually go to a particular field, but you can do anything. Here are a few examples of things you can do with various disciplines from people I know:

- My uncle has a sister with a master's degree in biomedical engineering who does quality analysis on surgical screws after they are removed from a patient

- My uncle also has a brother with a degree in electrical engineering who designs the electrical components for hospital equipment

- I have a cousin with a degree in civil engineering who went into the US army who now helps design interior structures for buildings

- I shadowed a mechanical engineer about a year ago at my dad's workplace who now does more management-type stuff, but before he did that he oversaw all the machinery in the building and designed a few machines himself to help with industrial processes (it's a sheet metal fabrication company)

- I had engineering TAs that went on to work at places like Toyota helping to design and improve car parts (mechanical engineering) or work at Kelloggs develop newer and safer food additives (chemical engineering)

The possibilities are endless, you just have to find what you want to do :)

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Hello Emily!

Uhm... Since you are studying engineering in a university in the US, do you think that it would be possible for one to do the freshman year in a not so good university and then getting highest GPA and transfer to a better one?

Also, do you think if there will be any difficulties regarding the subjects I choose?

Emily :)

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Hey there,

I am interested in maybe going into engineering (but still not sure which one... either Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Mechanical/Aerospace Engineering

Systems Engineering).

The subjects I'm going to take in the IB: HL Math, HL Physics, HL Economics, SL Chemistry, SL English A (Lang)Lit, SL German A LangLit. I reckon that my subject choices are sort of good for engineering (Maths HL, Physics HL)...

Questions:

1) For chemical engineering, do you need Chemistry HL? I know that the requirements differ from country to country and uni to uni... but in general?

2) What sort of jobs can you pursue after getting your XYZ engineering degree?

Thanks :)

1. Yes. Aim to take HL chemistry if you want to do chemical engineering. The other engineering disciplines you listed aren't really chemistry-based. Civil and mechanical engineering usually require a little chemistry, but none at the level or amount that chemical engineering does. SL chem is okay if you want to take it, but don't feel compelled to take it.

2. You can literally do anything with an engineering degree. Certain disciplines usually go to a particular field, but you can do anything. Here are a few examples of things you can do with various disciplines from people I know:

- My uncle has a sister with a master's degree in biomedical engineering who does quality analysis on surgical screws after they are removed from a patient

- My uncle also has a brother with a degree in electrical engineering who designs the electrical components for hospital equipment

- I have a cousin with a degree in civil engineering who went into the US army who now helps design interior structures for buildings

- I shadowed a mechanical engineer about a year ago at my dad's workplace who now does more management-type stuff, but before he did that he oversaw all the machinery in the building and designed a few machines himself to help with industrial processes (it's a sheet metal fabrication company)

- I had engineering TAs that went on to work at places like Toyota helping to design and improve car parts (mechanical engineering) or work at Kelloggs develop newer and safer food additives (chemical engineering)

The possibilities are endless, you just have to find what you want to do :)

Emily, the unemployment rate for engineers has increased a lot. More and more people in the business/finance/accounting sector are getting employed. Engineers are worse off than before(without petroleum) and I know people who work in stores after getting their bachelor's degree.The possibilities are endless only for mechanical engineers since they can basically work where ever they want. I have a friend who did his masters in electrical engineering at Stanford, he ended up as a teacher... Also, my uncle(not real uncle) knows a lot of people that got their degrees in engineering but since they didn't get a job they all ended up doing 1-2 more year(s) in the business/finance/accounting studies.

This only goes for engineers in the US I think. Hey, I might be wrong! I just had to share my point of view(hardcore TOK) ;)

Edited by Mikhael

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Hello Emily!

Uhm... Since you are studying engineering in a university in the US, do you think that it would be possible for one to do the freshman year in a not so good university and then getting highest GPA and transfer to a better one?

Also, do you think if there will be any difficulties regarding the subjects I choose?

Emily :)

Theoretically, yes you could transfer. Just be aware that if you do decide to transfer, some of your courses may not transfer over to your new uni (this is often the case when you take a university-specific course or something) and you will have to retake them. In addition, you usually don't get any financial aid at your new university (or if you do it's not a lot), so if finances are a concern, transferring might not be the best choice.

Emily, the unemployment rate for engineers has increased a lot. More and more people in the business/finance/accounting sector are getting employed. Engineers are worse off than before(without petroleum) and I know people who work in stores after getting their bachelor's degree.The possibilities are endless only for mechanical engineers since they can basically work where ever they want. I have a friend who did his masters in electrical engineering at Stanford, he ended up as a teacher... Also, my uncle(not real uncle) knows a lot of people that got their degrees in engineering but since they didn't get a job they all ended up doing 1-2 more year(s) in the business/finance/accounting studies.

This only goes for engineers in the US I think. Hey, I might be wrong! I just had to share my point of view(hardcore TOK) ;)

Employment is cyclical, meaning that sometimes certain industries are doing very well, and at other times they aren't. Petroleum is notorious for this, right now it's in a boom but that might change in five years. A few years ago in the US civil engineering was doing horribly when the housing bubble popped, but it's coming back now. The key to having a job is always staying current with technology and improving yourself, as well as having a good network of people. Also the US is coming out of a bad recession (we're out of the worst of it, but it's still not great yet) so that may be playing a small role in it.

That being said, you still have to do well in engineering to get a job (apart from knowing people). If your GPA is poor and/or you don't have any real-world experience (some sort of internship, a co-op program, engineering research) you will have a tough time getting a job. Simply studying engineering doesn't guarantee you a job.

Engineers often do well in business/finance because of mathematical and analytic skills needed for these jobs. Although not everyone has this in mind, sometimes they wind up in business because of that. Often after working in industry for a while engineers go to graduate school to get an MBA (business master's degree) to go into the management side of engineering and do well.

My math teacher in 12th grade was a former engineer. :P

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Hello Emily!

Uhm... Since you are studying engineering in a university in the US, do you think that it would be possible for one to do the freshman year in a not so good university and then getting highest GPA and transfer to a better one?

Also, do you think if there will be any difficulties regarding the subjects I choose?

Emily :)

Theoretically, yes you could transfer. Just be aware that if you do decide to transfer, some of your courses may not transfer over to your new uni (this is often the case when you take a university-specific course or something) and you will have to retake them. In addition, you usually don't get any financial aid at your new university (or if you do it's not a lot), so if finances are a concern, transferring might not be the best choice.

Emily, the unemployment rate for engineers has increased a lot. More and more people in the business/finance/accounting sector are getting employed. Engineers are worse off than before(without petroleum) and I know people who work in stores after getting their bachelor's degree.The possibilities are endless only for mechanical engineers since they can basically work where ever they want. I have a friend who did his masters in electrical engineering at Stanford, he ended up as a teacher... Also, my uncle(not real uncle) knows a lot of people that got their degrees in engineering but since they didn't get a job they all ended up doing 1-2 more year(s) in the business/finance/accounting studies.

This only goes for engineers in the US I think. Hey, I might be wrong! I just had to share my point of view(hardcore TOK) ;)

Employment is cyclical, meaning that sometimes certain industries are doing very well, and at other times they aren't. Petroleum is notorious for this, right now it's in a boom but that might change in five years. A few years ago in the US civil engineering was doing horribly when the housing bubble popped, but it's coming back now. The key to having a job is always staying current with technology and improving yourself, as well as having a good network of people. Also the US is coming out of a bad recession (we're out of the worst of it, but it's still not great yet) so that may be playing a small role in it.

That being said, you still have to do well in engineering to get a job (apart from knowing people). If your GPA is poor and/or you don't have any real-world experience (some sort of internship, a co-op program, engineering research) you will have a tough time getting a job. Simply studying engineering doesn't guarantee you a job.

Engineers often do well in business/finance because of mathematical and analytic skills needed for these jobs. Although not everyone has this in mind, sometimes they wind up in business because of that. Often after working in industry for a while engineers go to graduate school to get an MBA (business master's degree) to go into the management side of engineering and do well.

My math teacher in 12th grade was a former engineer. :P

I know that here in the UK, we've definitely got a shortage of Engineers and people with those sort of technical skills.

That's partly down to companies moving to other countries however, some of it is down to government policy and indeed the fact that if you call yourself an Engineer here, people may view you as a guy (or gal- I am in no way a sexist figure. But most probably a guy) with a spanner in his hand fixing a boiler. Engineering in this country as a term, is one that is being used hand in hand with car mechanics or boiler repair individuals. And I believe that's wrong. Engineering is a skill set which is cultivated. Not that these other professions are not, but there's a certain art to Engineering design and the field as a whole.

Also, with regards to female Engineers, there's that other perception- and I believe this is still very much a global view (please correct me if I'm wrong), that Engineering is a sweaty palmed man's world. Engineering as a field, is so broad. It's not just working with a hard hat on an oil rig for example, it could also include software engineering.

It's not just for the male species. All nerds welcome! :)

That's my rant over. I just love what I'm doing and wanted to express my opinion on this rapidly developing field. I love the fact that I chose to study Engineering and hope that I pass my exams coming up in 2 months time. :P

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Hello Emily!

Uhm... Since you are studying engineering in a university in the US, do you think that it would be possible for one to do the freshman year in a not so good university and then getting highest GPA and transfer to a better one?

Also, do you think if there will be any difficulties regarding the subjects I choose?

Emily :)

Theoretically, yes you could transfer. Just be aware that if you do decide to transfer, some of your courses may not transfer over to your new uni (this is often the case when you take a university-specific course or something) and you will have to retake them. In addition, you usually don't get any financial aid at your new university (or if you do it's not a lot), so if finances are a concern, transferring might not be the best choice.

Emily, the unemployment rate for engineers has increased a lot. More and more people in the business/finance/accounting sector are getting employed. Engineers are worse off than before(without petroleum) and I know people who work in stores after getting their bachelor's degree.The possibilities are endless only for mechanical engineers since they can basically work where ever they want. I have a friend who did his masters in electrical engineering at Stanford, he ended up as a teacher... Also, my uncle(not real uncle) knows a lot of people that got their degrees in engineering but since they didn't get a job they all ended up doing 1-2 more year(s) in the business/finance/accounting studies.

This only goes for engineers in the US I think. Hey, I might be wrong! I just had to share my point of view(hardcore TOK) ;)

Employment is cyclical, meaning that sometimes certain industries are doing very well, and at other times they aren't. Petroleum is notorious for this, right now it's in a boom but that might change in five years. A few years ago in the US civil engineering was doing horribly when the housing bubble popped, but it's coming back now. The key to having a job is always staying current with technology and improving yourself, as well as having a good network of people. Also the US is coming out of a bad recession (we're out of the worst of it, but it's still not great yet) so that may be playing a small role in it.

That being said, you still have to do well in engineering to get a job (apart from knowing people). If your GPA is poor and/or you don't have any real-world experience (some sort of internship, a co-op program, engineering research) you will have a tough time getting a job. Simply studying engineering doesn't guarantee you a job.

Engineers often do well in business/finance because of mathematical and analytic skills needed for these jobs. Although not everyone has this in mind, sometimes they wind up in business because of that. Often after working in industry for a while engineers go to graduate school to get an MBA (business master's degree) to go into the management side of engineering and do well.

My math teacher in 12th grade was a former engineer. :P

I know that here in the UK, we've definitely got a shortage of Engineers and people with those sort of technical skills.

That's partly down to companies moving to other countries however, some of it is down to government policy and indeed the fact that if you call yourself an Engineer here, people may view you as a guy (or gal- I am in no way a sexist figure. But most probably a guy) with a spanner in his hand fixing a boiler. Engineering in this country as a term, is one that is being used hand in hand with car mechanics or boiler repair individuals. And I believe that's wrong. Engineering is a skill set which is cultivated. Not that these other professions are not, but there's a certain art to Engineering design and the field as a whole.

Also, with regards to female Engineers, there's that other perception- and I believe this is still very much a global view (please correct me if I'm wrong), that Engineering is a sweaty palmed man's world. Engineering as a field, is so broad. It's not just working with a hard hat on an oil rig for example, it could also include software engineering.

It's not just for the male species. All nerds welcome! :)

That's my rant over. I just love what I'm doing and wanted to express my opinion on this rapidly developing field. I love the fact that I chose to study Engineering and hope that I pass my exams coming up in 2 months time. :P

Well, I can understand where your opinions are coming from. I know that it can be hard to be British but I still respect your culture. :shifty:

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Hello everyone. Hope exam studying is going well.

I'd like to bring in a little piece of what engineering school is actually like, since most people here (myself included before going to uni) have no idea what you actually do in school. This is the culmination of my fundamentals of engineering course that I worked on for the better half of the spring semester (beginning of January - end of April).

In my engineering class we were asked to design a vehicle that could meet particular objectives given certain constraints. We were given a box full of materials, such as plastic pieces, propellers, motors, wheels, hanging arms, screws/bolts, etc. We could use any materials in the box to build the vehicle, as well as any outside materials we wanted so long as they didn't destroy any of the box pieces. The vehicle had to be able to hang off of a railing, have at least one motor, and no metal could be attached to the basic computer-like portion of the vehicle (an Arduino for anyone who messes around with that stuff). This had to be done in a team, which was assigned at the beginning of the semester. My team consisted of myself, two computer science majors, and one materials science major. You'll be doing a lot of team projects, so if you hate people, get over that soon, or learn to hide it.

The vehicle had to be able to complete a circuit accurately. To do this, you had to write and develop a program that was downloaded to the Arduino. The vehicle had to propel itself to a gate and stop in a certain spot, and wait for gate clearance. It then had to travel to a loading center where it would grab onto a caboose and attach via a magnet at the front of the vehicle and end of the caboose. It then had to travel back to the gate and stop, waiting for clearance again. Then it had to travel back to its starting position with the caboose in tow. All tasks had to be completed within two minutes of time. The goal was to use as little energy as possible.

We could also, if we wanted, design a custom-printed part for our vehicle. We made two: a body that met everything we needed to do, and an arm connected to a servo motor (which we rented through the engineering department for use) that physically grabbed the track so it didn't move around. We designed these in a CAD drawing software program and used 3-D printing machines to print them out.

The entire process had to be documented, so any initial brainstorming, lab documentation, etc had to be documented. Each week we focused on something different. Initial labs had us learning different techniques that could be used, such as learning to use reflectance sensors (which made programming easier), finding out how much energy we used and how to reduce it, and how to better our code. This involved a lot of lab reports and paperwork, but it's an important part of your design process.

In the end my team ended up using 217 joules of energy total (which was good, but could be improved upon. The baseline provided in class for the pre-assembled vehicle we tested at the very beginning was around 1100 joules of energy). We went to a showcase competition involving the best two vehicles from each class and competed for best engineered and best performing vehicle. We didn't win, but it was still fun.

Here are some pictures from the semester:

This is the vehicle we made:

I6d6upt.jpg?1

This is with the servo arm that we developed. The vehicle is holding onto the hanger, and is not moving or sliding.

JYZc4L9.jpg?1

Our group poster from the showcase:

0tCULs9.jpg?1

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Hello!!

I have an engineering related question.

What's better? Going directly into an Aerospace Engineering bachelors program, and then a masters in the domain, or doing a Mechanical Engineering program, and then a masters in the aerospace domain?

Basically, what's better between Aerospace vs Mechanical, considering that I will be doing a masters program in Aerospace.

The goal is to work in the aerospace domain.

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Hello!!

I have an engineering related question.

What's better? Going directly into an Aerospace Engineering bachelors program, and then a masters in the domain, or doing a Mechanical Engineering program, and then a masters in the aerospace domain?

Basically, what's better between Aerospace vs Mechanical, considering that I will be doing a masters program in Aerospace.

The goal is to work in the aerospace domain.

I would say they're both very similar and you should be fine picking whichever one you'd feel more interested in doing. Aerospace engineering is often considered to be a subset of mechanical engineering and are usually in the same department. You're going to be doing similar things that a mechanical engineer would do, except you focus primarily on bodies and parts that go towards aero-ish stuff. That being said, a mechanical engineer and an aerospace engineer can still end up working at the same place as long as your experience and skills are relevant to the job being asked.

I'd pick whichever degree you find to be more interesting. If you're afraid of changing your mind (no longer working in aerospace but still want to do engineering) or want broader options, you might want to opt for a mechanical engineering degree for your bachelor's program, but you shouldn't have a problem doing a master's later on in aerospace regardless of the path you take.

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I would say they're both very similar and you should be fine picking whichever one you'd feel more interested in doing. Aerospace engineering is often considered to be a subset of mechanical engineering and are usually in the same department. You're going to be doing similar things that a mechanical engineer would do, except you focus primarily on bodies and parts that go towards aero-ish stuff. That being said, a mechanical engineer and an aerospace engineer can still end up working at the same place as long as your experience and skills are relevant to the job being asked.

I'd pick whichever degree you find to be more interesting. If you're afraid of changing your mind (no longer working in aerospace but still want to do engineering) or want broader options, you might want to opt for a mechanical engineering degree for your bachelor's program, but you shouldn't have a problem doing a master's later on in aerospace regardless of the path you take.

Ok, thanks!

Another question (I need to assess all my options).

Can I go to an Aerospace bachelors engineering program, and then specialize ( in case i can't find a job or smth) in another engineering domain? Like.. bachelors in Aerospace, cause it has the basics in any engineering too, and then masters in automobiles or smth.

Edited by abaaaabbbb63

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