Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Are IB schools allowed to change the official deadlines?

Recommended Posts

Well, I don't think they are, especially not when the initial deadlines have already been announced. However, I know that each school is allowed to choose some specific dates for certain things, such as EE (in some schools you must finish it during IB1, whereas some schools start the entire process in the second year). Unless they didn't notify you in advance so you could prepare yourself for the new deadlines, then I don't think it's allowed.

 

Although I might be wrong, anyone correct me if it is so.  :eek:  :eek:  :eek:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My school did the same thing for our Extended Essays and CAS. It was just a precautionary step taken to allow us to finish them early, so that we could focus more on our revision when the time came. I actually think it's very useful getting them out of the way and done before exam time arrives. Just try your best, IB stress can be drowning sometimes - trust me I've been through that - but you'll pull through eventually. Good Luck! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Schools can't change official deadlines, but most schools have their own internal deadlines. These deadlines are generally just to make sure that you don't have 10 IAs all due around the same time. Your work will still have to get submitted by the same official deadline, but the school might have the deadline earlier and hold on to your assignment for a while before sending it off. So the internal deadlines, yes, the school can change them.  

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you mean the points in your IB diploma, then I don't think so. Obviously, as long as you didn't miss the deadline by a couple of months, you should be fine. You can always ask your coordinator because inevitably it's your school's choice. Some teachers might be much more cruel and degrade you because of handing something in later than it was initially due. Likewise the grades you'll get add up to your overall score so sometimes they may give you a grade lower in that one assignment you delivered later  :dontgetit:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They can't alter your IB points or down-grade anything you've handed in which will count towards those points - so even if you hand in an IA two weeks late, provided you're still within the IB deadline and the school haven't sent all the IAs off yet (if they have, you're screwed), they have to mark it fairly. All their marking gets moderated so it would be unacceptable for them to mark you down.

 

They can however down-grade anything which is purely internal, if it makes them happy. They can also give you poor predicted grades and a poor reference for University. They're totally within their rights to do that. The IB has official deadlines for the last minute a piece of work can be sent to them and they'll allow it to count for your exams - your school's deadlines cannot be used against you in terms of IB points, but if you're really late handing work in then that's a genuine reflection of you as a student and if that ended up in your reference for a University place or a job, it's actually just being truthful about your attitude to work.

 

Almost all schools have their own independent deadlines, usually staggered (to stop you getting overwhelmed) and earlier than the official deadline (to allow for useless students who can't get stuff finished on time, or for people who have something awful happen and need some extra time). It's actually in your interests to try and stick to their deadlines because they will protect you from screwing up. The worst that happens is you finish stuff early - and if something did happen like your computer got wiped, you had a death in the family or something really awful, you've actually got some leeway for the school to try and help you out before the final deadline passes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.