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EE English RQ: Lewis Carroll and Politics

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So my question started out as a "to what extent" question but I changed it when I realized that I have to talk about to what extent it does and doesn't do the... thing.

 

So now my question is "How and why does Lewis Carroll express his opinions about British Politics in Alice's Adventures Through Wonderland, Alice Through the Looking-Glass (and what she found there), and Phantasmagoria?"

 

Do you think that's narrow enough? They suddenly sprung this draft due date upon us with only a two week's notice and I just wanted to check before I commit.

 

Next question will be about the resources :P

 

So I've been using "The Annotated Alice" for... annotating. And I dog eared any page that has a reference to politics and how I can analyze Carroll's books as a political allegory (satire). This book has helped a lot during yesterdays 9 am- 4am annotating session for the two alice books. However I'm having trouble connecting Phantasmagoria to politics even though I have this gut feeling that its riddled with references. I've been looking online and can't find anything but a Marilyn Manson movie *sigh*. Even if I can analyze it satirically and prove it with my own ideas and opinions, it wouldn't be as reliable as having a valid resource for it. So do you guys have any ideas?

 

Also what do you think of my topic in general? It really interests me and amongst my frantic annotating, research, and (hopefully today) outlining, the fact that I love this subject and my supervisor has kept me going.

 

I'm still in shock that this thing is due this thursday, nonetheless, I shall flourish in the wake of chaotic IB drama. Hopefully I'll start and finish my outline today (another all-nighter) so that I can go over it with the doctor tomorrow. Which reminds me, do you guys know any good outline format for something as long as the EE? It would really help if you did :)

 

 

Thank you in advance, my fellow IB survivors. 

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Carroll definitely references current politics in the Alice books, especially Looking Glass. However, I have never heard of the poem, nor from cursory searches have I found very much that suggests that it references politics. So unless you're ready to undertake thesis level work to research what it could be or if there are obvious identical analogies used in Alice and the poem, I wouldn't use the poem. 

 

From what I understand, the Alice books are commonly used topics, but the politics is an interesting thing to look at. If you could make it original somehow (like how Carroll's politics changed between the books or something), then you'd be better off. I personally like the topic a lot, and don't see any trouble with it, so long as you leave out the poem.

 

Change 'how and why' to 'in what ways and for what reasons.' IB loves that :)

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Okay, time for an update on my research question!

 

Now it's: In What Ways and To What Effect Does Lewis Carroll Express His Opinions About British Politics in "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" and "Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There"?

 

But alas, a new problem has shown itself and reared its ugly head.

 

For "What Ways", I can talk about Carroll's use of:

Stylistic Devices

John Tenniel's art

Semantics

Characterization (dialogue)

 

But I'm a little confused about "To What Effect", nonetheless, this is what I got so far:

Original Audience= Victorian= Children--> To warn them/ make them realize how corrupted the system is/ educate them in a fun way

Adults--> ridicule their silence/ rebuke them for aiding this corruption/ make them realize how corrupted the system is

Note: * At the time (Victorian Era) it wasn't rare to use writing as a means to mock politics and Victorian societies (e.g. Oscar Wilde).

Modern Audience= Why is this text still popular? Why is it considered a "classic"?--> It satirically represents the still relateable theme and situation of a corrupted government

 

Am I on the right track? Or am I WAY off? Also any suggestions for both is appreciated :) 

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Okay, time for an update on my research question!

 

Now it's: In What Ways and To What Effect Does Lewis Carroll Express His Opinions About British Politics in "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" and "Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There"?

 

But alas, a new problem has shown itself and reared its ugly head.

 

For "What Ways", I can talk about Carroll's use of:

Stylistic Devices

John Tenniel's art

Semantics

Characterization (dialogue)

 

But I'm a little confused about "To What Effect", nonetheless, this is what I got so far:

Original Audience= Victorian= Children--> To warn them/ make them realize how corrupted the system is/ educate them in a fun way

Adults--> ridicule their silence/ rebuke them for aiding this corruption/ make them realize how corrupted the system is

Note: * At the time (Victorian Era) it wasn't rare to use writing as a means to mock politics and Victorian societies (e.g. Oscar Wilde).

Modern Audience= Why is this text still popular? Why is it considered a "classic"?--> It satirically represents the still relateable theme and situation of a corrupted government

 

Am I on the right track? Or am I WAY off? Also any suggestions for both is appreciated :)

I think you're on the right track. I think you should look carefully at your 'in what ways' that you listed and ask yourself why Carroll did those things. That is, 'to what effect'? So, what specifically did the stylistic decisions imply to the reader? 

 

I can't comment on the actual analysis you listed. It seems plausible enough - if you have the quotations to back it up!

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