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Getting accepted to LSE with 38 or 39 points ?

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Hello guys 

 

I have just recently read the entry requirements for the LSE Accounting & Finance undergraduate course it states that LSE will require you to have 38 points HL math is desired but not necessary. Based on the fact that LSE does not have interviews with their potential students I would guess that they do only take into account your motivational letter or personal statement and obviously your grades. 

 

Now to my question !

 

How high is the chance of getting accepted with lets say 39 points and SL math but a very appealing personal statement and CV ? Of course I know that nobody will know the exact answer to this question however I would still be interested what you guys think about this topic ? I mean if they have 120 free spots they might as well get 120 applications with 42+ points (thats at least what I think) so would they even consider someone with "only" 39 points and SL math or even prefer this person over the one with 40+ points based on the better personal statement and CV of the applicant with 39 points?

 

Would be glad to hear some other opinions on this topic because i can't seem to figure out how anybody with 38 or 39 points can be accepted ?

 

Thank you very much for your feedback  

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Guest Sonia

I think you have good chances :) As long as you satisfy their IB grade requirement, then a good personal statement and CV will help a lot. But at the same time, there is strong competition so in the end of the day... who knows? 

Good luck! :D

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Gonna be honest here. It's gonna be difficult. So many kids with high scores apply to LSE so you may be ignored. Try to inflate your predicted as high as you possibly can because you need any advantage you can get. The personal statement is just as important too. After you get your offer, feel free to get 38 or 39 or whatever because all you need to do is meet the requirements. So yes it is possible to get into LSE with 38 or 39 but you need to get the offer first. To get the offer you need amazing predicted grades and an even better personal statement.

 

You need a very high predicted grades because LSE knows its difficult to reach your predicted grades and will expect them to drop.

 

Also, unis don't look at CVs. I don't know where you heard that you need the CV for but you honestly don't. Go to UCAS and see how it works.

 

As for SL or HL Math I'm not too sure. One of the modules that you have to take in Accounting is MA107 and the level of math required in MA107 is much much higher than SL Math. So they may consider dropping your application. If you have any other way of proving your mathematical aptitude through science subjects or math competitions or such it would benefit you. But I'm still not so sure about whether you take SL or HL Math matters. Take this advice with a grain of salt. 

 

But do remember. Literally millions of people are applying to LSE every year. LSE will try to find any reason to weed out applicants. Hope you do well.

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I was rejected with a predicted score of 45 (for econometrics) . Like JYC said, they are looking for reasons to reject you. I was rejected due to my language choices (which I believe was unfair but they couldn't care less about that). Nonetheless, if you have a great PS, go for it!

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As long as you meet the minimum requirement, that's all they care about as far as grades are concerned. But your PS has to be amazing. LSE has a long-standing reputation for relying on the PS.

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