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P2 Vulgar Terms on the Paper 2 Exam

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While going through my Paper 2 plays for the final time, I have noticed that in one of the plays that we have studied, the "n" word is frequently employed (the play is Joe Turner's Come and Gone by August Wilson). Thus, on the exam, I'm not sure how I should quote the play if a certain quotation contains that word! I am not particularly comfortable using the word, but I am unsure if I can simply write "n---", or something along those lines on the exam. 

 

So, my question is, will the examiner understand and is it acceptable if I write something like "n---" instead of the actual word, or should I actually use the term in my quotations?

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I think you should probably write out the whole word if you're doing a quotation. That's what quotations are supposed to be - directly taken from the text. Would the examiner understand? They may or may not, but I do think they'll understand you using the profanity if it is coming from your text, so you don't have to worry about that part.

 

If it makes you too uncomfortable, do other quotations or use a different play altogether, but I think the only real obstacle to overcome is your own comfort level with writing the word.

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Use it. If it is used in the play, then quote exactly -- and fully, without second thought or misgivings. Forget political correctness as well: it is just another form of intolerance and hypocriscy, more concerned with appearances than addressing the real thing (to my mind, the institutionalised racism which we participate in--all of us).

 

Using the word doesn't mean you are being racist: it is you quoting the word as spoken by others. If you change it, replace it with a "more acceptable" word, then you are distorting the play, the meanings etc. which is the worst thing you can do to literature because you are tinkering with it and practising a form of censorship. It's like schools in North America (and now Britain) banning Huckleberry Finn for "using unacceptable language". A complete misunderstanding of the novel and disrespect for Clemens/Twain. 

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I think you should probably write out the whole word if you're doing a quotation. That's what quotations are supposed to be - directly taken from the text. Would the examiner understand? They may or may not, but I do think they'll understand you using the profanity if it is coming from your text, so you don't have to worry about that part.

 

If it makes you too uncomfortable, do other quotations or use a different play altogether, but I think the only real obstacle to overcome is your own comfort level with writing the word.

 

Use it. If it is used in the play, then quote exactly -- and fully, without second thought or misgivings. Forget political correctness as well: it is just another form of intolerance and hypocriscy, more concerned with appearances than addressing the real thing (to my mind, the institutionalised racism which we participate in--all of us).

 

Using the word doesn't mean you are being racist: it is you quoting the word as spoken by others. If you change it, replace it with a "more acceptable" word, then you are distorting the play, the meanings etc. which is the worst thing you can do to literature because you are tinkering with it and practising a form of censorship. It's like schools in North America (and now Britain) banning Huckleberry Finn for "using unacceptable language". A complete misunderstanding of the novel and disrespect for Clemens/Twain. 

 

Thank you for the replies. I will take the advice and use the word if need be. I appreciate the advice!

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