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Confused as to what calculations and graphs to do for survey data

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So a while back I conducted a survey about career paths and gathered 100 responses from 50 male and 50 female participants. Originally I wanted to have responses from people of all ages to see if men and women's choice of career path differed greatly from those born in the 1950s to the 2000s. I asked participants for their gender, age and chosen career within 13 different professional fields (example: sciences, art, education... etc) but what I realised is that the majority of my participants turned out to be born in the 1990s and I only got a few born in the '70s, '60s and '50s. Does this mean I shouldn't do the age comparison thing at all?

 

It's sort of too late to gather more data at this point. But if I stick to gender and 13 professional fields, what sort of graphs and calculations should I do? My teacher sent me a few IA examples but none of them involved surveys, plus I'm really quite clueless as to how to process what I have. Does anyone have advice, perhaps from experience with their own IAs? 

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The best way is to acknowledge that your data may be distorted, instead of throwing the whole thing away.

Data presentation shouldn't depend on whether the data was from survey, a book, or online.
There are two may types of numerical data: discrete vs continuous. Continuous means you can take any value (such as 3, pi, 4, sqrt 2) over an interval. Discrete means you can only have certain choices, for example you cannot get pi or sqrt 2 as an answer, but 3 and 4 are ok.

The key thing is to make multiple graphs for different emphasis. If you are keen to have a graph representing all the data, consider a http://betterevaluation.org/sites/default/files/2d_StackedColumnChart2.png (stacked bar graph). Many common graph builder or spreadsheet software can do this.

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The best way is to acknowledge that your data may be distorted, instead of throwing the whole thing away.

Data presentation shouldn't depend on whether the data was from survey, a book, or online.

There are two may types of numerical data: discrete vs continuous. Continuous means you can take any value (such as 3, pi, 4, sqrt 2) over an interval. Discrete means you can only have certain choices, for example you cannot get pi or sqrt 2 as an answer, but 3 and 4 are ok.

The key thing is to make multiple graphs for different emphasis. If you are keen to have a graph representing all the data, consider a http://betterevaluation.org/sites/default/files/2d_StackedColumnChart2.png (stacked bar graph). Many common graph builder or spreadsheet software can do this.

Hey thanks for the reply! Was expecting to be called an idiot. ^_^ I've considered using that graph, I was just worried because we haven't seen that kind in class.

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