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Hardest topic in Physics?

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I would say its between Quantum and Electromagnetic Induction, but quantum is interesting so I would say electro is just harder in general for me

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For me the hardest topic was gravitation & field. The concepts were not too hard, but it was extremely difficult for me to avoid logical mistakes in this topic. Quantum physics was alright to me, and like you said, super-interesting. So I didn't have any problem with it. Electromagnetic induction was hard in the beginning. But once I learned calculus from Maths HL, everything became much more understandable with induction.

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I've always believed that the difficulty of a topic is based on how much it interests you. For me, I don't particularly like waves but absolutely love electromagnetism. Thus I  find waves quite hard to understand while electromagnetism feels like a walk in the park. It all depends on your ability to relate to it. 

Edited by aviator123

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I´d say induction was quite hard given that we never got to complete that topic. Considering the options, relativity has some hard maths, the concept can be complicated to grasp at the start but then you sort of get it.

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Guest SNJERIN

I think the difficulty of physics does not lie in the concepts but in the questions. For example, I was very confident that I had a full understanding of electromagnetic induction until I got a question on the application of EM induction in load speakers (which was from may 15 physics paper 2) that I felt all of my understanding on this concept just collapsed. However I usually find nuclear physics is quite tricky, with all the ways one can express the binding energy of a nucleus in ( u, MeVc^-2 etc.).    

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 However I usually find nuclear physics is quite tricky, with all the ways one can express the binding energy of a nucleus in ( u, MeVc^-2 etc.).

Be careful @Haitham Wahid, u and MeV/c2  are not (binding) energy units, these are mass units. (Binding) energies are usually expressed in MeV (or MeV per nucleon).

For example when you calculate a mass defect, you end up with (Delta)m = xxx u, that you can convert to MeV/c2 by multiplying by 931.5. When you  give your final answer for the energy, you use the same number but just remove the "/c2" from the unit.

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