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So confused about the exam

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So, my school is completely new to the IB thing, and even though our teachers suppose to be familiar with the program, I feel that some of them are as confused as the students are. 
And our psychology teacher is like that. No doubt he is a good teacher - lessons are fun and interesting, but it seems to me that we are too relaxed. We don't use the textbook, go from one field to another, and most of our class time is spent on her telling fun stories about her friends or "cool" childhood. Sometimes they are related to the topic, but still. 
Is it supposed to be that chill? 
For now we've done Some cognition and emotion stuff, deviancy, creativity, love and social influence 
 
We haven't studied any theories or experiments but I heard that it might be a huge thing in the exam. 
 
The thing is I don't even know what the exams will be like. 
Do we get to choose something? 
What topics do we suppose to know? 
It is 3 part right? What paper 1 includes? Paper 2? 
The only thing I know how to do is IA.

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This is the structure of the exam:

 

Paper 1

Section A. Short answer questions.

All questions must be answered. 8 marks maximum awarded for each question.

1. A question on the biological level of analysis.

2. A question on the cognitive level of analysis.

3. A question on the socio-cultural level of analysis.

Section B. Essay response questions.

One question is answered (free choice). 22 marks maximum awarded.

1. A question on the biological perspective.

2. A question on the cognitive perspective.

3. A question on the socio-cultural perspective.

Paper 2

15 questions on part 2 of the syllabus. Students choose 1 question to answer in essay form.

  • Abnormal psychology 
  • Developmental psychology
  • Health psychology
  • Psychology of human relationships
  • Sport psychology

 

About your concerns of your class being too relaxed, my first year was also pretty chill and we were always doing projects, but almost no one gets a 7 here so maybe you should ask for someone's else's opinion 

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Having studies to back up any answer to the exams is crucial, I think. If you don't learn enough of them in class, I suggest some websites like ibpsychnotes or ibguides. Try not to rely completely on the notes though - it's always best to find original copies of studies, or even just abstracts. Best of luck~

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10 hours ago, claudiah said:

This is the structure of the exam:

 

 

Paper 1

Section A. Short answer questions.

All questions must be answered. 8 marks maximum awarded for each question.

1. A question on the biological level of analysis.

2. A question on the cognitive level of analysis.

3. A question on the socio-cultural level of analysis.

Section B. Essay response questions.

One question is answered (free choice). 22 marks maximum awarded.

1. A question on the biological perspective.

2. A question on the cognitive perspective.

3. A question on the socio-cultural perspective.

Paper 2

15 questions on part 2 of the syllabus. Students choose 1 question to answer in essay form.

  • Abnormal psychology 
  • Developmental psychology
  • Health psychology
  • Psychology of human relationships
  • Sport psychology

 

About your concerns of your class being too relaxed, my first year was also pretty chill and we were always doing projects, but almost no one gets a 7 here so maybe you should ask for someone's else's opinion 

This is a great description. However, do note it is for SL. HL has to do 2 options in paper 2, and has a paper 3 on qualitative methods as well. 

 

If your teacher isn't teaching you about studies, then they're effectively not doing their job well. Every concept you're learning absolutely MUST be backed by studies. You'll lose piles of marks in the exam if you don't mention studies in your answers. Some questions in paper 1 are explicitly about studies. You said you're not using a textbook - is it because you don't have one or just not using the one you have? If you have one, it should have studies in there. If you don't, I recommend getting a guide (I think it's Oxford, it goes through each learning outcome in a concise way) and a proper textbook (I got Pearson Baccalaureate and loved it <3). 

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