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[b]I NEED HELP!! i've been told by my english teacher that she prefers that i do two books for my English A1 EE analysis... thing is, i did find a book that i really like : TOni Morrison's "Beloved"

But.

I DON"T KNOW another book that goes along with this!!! I bought Alice Walker's "The colour Purple" But, i can't find a single common ground!

Any suggestion? Need Help ASAP![/b]

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[quote name='Dark Butterfly' post='27169' date='Oct 23 2008, 05:18 PM'][b]I NEED HELP!! i've been told by my english teacher that she prefers that i do two books for my English A1 EE analysis... thing is, i did find a book that i really like : TOni Morrison's "Beloved"

But.

I DON"T KNOW another book that goes along with this!!! I bought Alice Walker's "The colour Purple" But, i can't find a single common ground!

Any suggestion? Need Help ASAP![/b][/quote]

Maybe if you could tell us what it is about. I have to admit I haven't read it

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[quote name='monica' post='27172' date='Oct 24 2008, 01:51 AM']Maybe if you could tell us what it is about. I have to admit I haven't read it[/quote]

Well.. It's way too much information, so here's the link... I think it gives quite a good summary on what the book is about....
[url="http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/beloved"]http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/beloved[/url]

Can u help??.... I'm meeting with my supervisor tomorrow on help about my research question... hopefully see can give some insight... Or SOMETHING... anything!!! T^T

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Listen:

1. Starting a thread title with Helppp! isn't bound to raise much sympathy for you.
2. Writing your entire thread starter in bold is annoying.
3. This is [b]your own[/b] essay, you need to do your own research.
4. Expecting us to read an entire spark notes page? C'mon I think you can summarize it yourself.
5. In the time it took you to wait for a reply to the thread, you surely could have gotten some kind of headway yourself.

If you really can't find any book yourself, maybe you should change it. Or you can try looking for similar books on amazon: [url="http://www.amazon.com/Beloved-Toni-Morrison/dp/0452280621/ref=cm_srch_res_rpsy_1"]http://www.amazon.com/Beloved-Toni-Morriso...srch_res_rpsy_1[/url]

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If you already have the book The Colour Purple maybe looking it up on Sparknotes might help?

A brief glance at the Themes page of both books give a few similarities

Source: [url="http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/purple/themes.html"]http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/purple/themes.html[/url]
[url="http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/beloved/themes.html"]http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/beloved/themes.html[/url]


[quote]Colors

Throughout the novel, the appearance of brighter colors indicates the liberation various characters experience. Walker uses color to signal renewals and rebirths at several points in the novel. When Kate takes Celie shopping for a new dress, the only color options are drab ones—brown, maroon, and dark blue. Later, Celie and Sofia use bright yellow fabric from Shug's dress to make a quilt. When Celie describes her religious awakening, she marvels how she never noticed the wonders that God has made, such as “the color purple.” Upon Mr. ______'s transformation, he paints the entire interior of his house “fresh and white,” signaling his new beginning.

The Color Red

Colors from the red part of the spectrum (including orange and pink) recur throughout Beloved, although the meaning of these red objects varies. Amy Denver's red velvet, for example, is an image of hope and a brighter future, while Paul D's “red heart” represents feeling and emotion. Overall, red seems to connote vitality and the visceral nature of human existence. Yet, in Beloved, vitality often goes hand in hand with mortality, and red images simultaneously refer to life and death, to presence and absence. For example, the red roses that line the road to the carnival serve to herald the carnival's arrival in town and announce the beginning of Sethe, Denver, and Paul D's new life together; yet they also stink of death. The red rooster signifies manhood to Paul D, but it is a manhood that Paul D himself has been denied. The story of Amy's search for carmine velvet seems especially poignant because we sense the futility of her dream. Sethe's memory is awash with the red of her daughter's blood and the pink mineral of her gravestone, both of which have been bought at a dear price.


God

In the early parts of the novel, Celie sees God as her listener and helping hand, yet Celie does not have a clear understanding of who God is. She knows deep down that her image of God as a white patriarch “don't seem quite right,” but she says it's all she has. Shug invites Celie to imagine God as something radically different, as an “it” that delights in creation and just wants human beings to love what it has created. Eventually, Celie stops thinking of God as she stops thinking of the other men in her life—she “git man off her eyeball” and tells God off, writing, “You must be sleep.” But after Celie has chased her patriarchal God away and come up with a new concept of God, she writes in her last letter, “Dear God. Dear stars, dear trees, dear sky, dear peoples. Dear Everything. Dear God.” This reimagining of God on her own terms symbolizes Celie's move from an object of someone else's care to an independent woman. It also indicates that her voice is now sufficiently empowered to create her own narrative.

Allusions to Christianity

Beloved's epigraph, taken from Romans 9:25, bespeaks the presence that Christian ideas will have in the novel. The “four horsemen” who come for Sethe reference the description of the Apocalypse found in the Book of Revelations. Beloved is reborn into Sethe's world drenched in a sort of baptismal water. As an infant, Denver drinks her sister's blood along with her mother's breast milk, which can be interpreted as an act of Communion that links Denver and Beloved and that highlights the sacrificial aspect of the baby's death. Sethe's act so horrifies schoolteacher that he leaves without taking her other children, allowing them to live in freedom. The baby's sacrificial death, like that of Christ, brings salvation. The book's larger discussions of sin, sacrifice, redemption, forgiveness, love, and resurrection similarly resound with biblical references.[/quote]

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[quote name='HMSChocolate' post='27239' date='Oct 26 2008, 11:45 PM']If you already have the book The Colour Purple maybe looking it up on Sparknotes might help?

A brief glance at the Themes page of both books give a few similarities

Source: [url="http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/purple/themes.html"]http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/purple/themes.html[/url]
[url="http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/beloved/themes.html"]http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/beloved/themes.html[/url][/quote]

Thanks to the both of you... with critizism or not, you guys did try to help. ^^ I'll try to search some more, though i have less than a week to finalize my research question.

I'll TRY harder, to find some connections between "Beloved" and "The Color Purple", but i'll probably try to search for more books. hopefully i'll stumble upon a miracle?

Thanks a bunch.

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