crycry

EE in solar panels

I asked a similar question previously but I'm asking again about something slightly different. I'm writing my EE in physics, and my research question is "how does wavelength of light affect the energy output of a photovoltaic cell?" I'm planning to use different lightbulbs which have different wavelengths to find out how the wavelength affect the voltage (or current) of the solar panel. Some example of those lights are: incandescent bulb, fluorescent bulb, LED light, sunlight and UV light. Since I'm not very confident in physics, can any physics genius tell me whether this is a worthy experiment? What if the wavelength doesn't affect the voltage (or current)? I really need your advice!!!

 

Edited by crycry

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6 hours ago, crycry said:

I asked a similar question previously but I'm asking again about something slightly different. I'm writing my EE in physics, and my research question is "how does wavelength of light affect the energy output of a photovoltaic cell?" I'm planning to use different lightbulbs which have different wavelengths to find out how the wavelength affect the voltage (or current) of the solar panel. Some example of those lights are: incandescent bulb, fluorescent bulb, LED light, sunlight and UV light. Since I'm not very confident in physics, can any physics genius tell me whether this is a worthy experiment? What if the wavelength doesn't affect the voltage (or current)? I really need your advice!!!

Self-disclaimer I took SL physics and I am not a physics genius.

Constant voltage is not a bad results (if that were to be the case). Constant voltage is what Planck used to justify how the light needed for an atom to emit an electron requires a certain minimum of frequency of light (photoelectric effect). 

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I'm working on something at the moment of dye sensitized thin film solar cells, a cheaper form of photovolatic cell, specifically TiO2 as material of choice.  Wavelength,light intensity- it all interconnects.

 

"The long term stability of cell performance was tested by illuminating the thin TiO2 film loaded with visible (lambda >400nm light for 2 months.)  The change in photocurrent was less than 10% over this period, during which a charge of 62000 C cm^2 was passed through the device corresponding to a turnover number of 5*10^6 for the sensitizer."

 

The above quote is from a book I'm reading now.  From this, you can see that it takes time to get quanitifiable results.   So, please consider this for your experiment.   I think you're experiment is definitely worth doing and looking into.    It's worthy. The best part of a science invesitigation or experiment is that if it's not worthy talking about then- as in if you get dud results that show wavelength doesn't affect Voltage, then you can still try and talk about it.  Explain why the results are out of whack in accordance to your hypothesis.   

If you need help at any point, please feel free to message me.   I'm also doing a dissertation on thermal glazing and insulation.   So light, waves, intensity, energy management systems and solar cells is what I'm looking into.

 

Thanks

 

A

Edited by nametaken
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