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What do 7 students do at home?

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As a matter of interest, what do 7 (41-45/45) IB students when they're not at school? What is/was their daily routine; How much did they procrastinate everyday? How long did they work in one stretch? When do they start and stop working? What time frame is reserved for home work, and what for studying? Do they just combine the 2 and save time? How much do they mess around with friends? etc..

7 students, give me some inspiration.
:(

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Guest Philippe Arni
[quote name='EconSurvivor' post='28925' date='Nov 24 2008, 07:27 PM']As a matter of interest, what do 7 (41-45/45) IB students when they're not at school? What is/was their daily routine; How much did they procrastinate everyday? How long did they work in one stretch? When do they start and stop working? What time frame is reserved for home work, and what for studying? Do they just combine the 2 and save time? How much do they mess around with friends? etc..

7 students, give me some inspiration.
:( [/quote]

Good question, I have been asking myself the same question. However, some of them have told me that they do not do anything different from us...
It may be hard to believe so but the bottom line is that they are SMART! lol Im sure your capable of being a 7 student too anyone is, if they work their
ass off...

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I always procrastinate, even though I know it's bad.

When I'm doing homework, I'm always listening to music/watching TV and talking on MSN at the same time. But when I'm hardcore studying, I'll be studying for 5 hours at a time with minimal breaks.

For essays, I can write for an entire day. I like to get it all over at once, I don't want to ruin my flow.

I can't combine homework and studying, because my studying style is cramming, so I do homework when it's assigned, and then leave the studying to the night before/morning of the test.

Do what works for you, because there's no one formula that will guarantee you a high IB score.

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I was a day-boarder, so after I finished classes I was still at school. But general I would have some sort of sport or activity at school straight after school. If I didn't it was prime studying or procrastinating time, always to a soundtrack which varied from rock music to Harry potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban audiobook. So then dinner woud be at 5:30 and then I would hang around with my friends after dinner until 7pm when we had schedualed homework time until 8:30 when I would go home. I got home at 9 and then talked to my parents until around 10 usually, then I would work from 10:30 to 11:30 or 12:30 depending on mood. On the weekends though I would work from 11am until 6pm and 9pm to 12pm with music all the time and long breaks, procrastinating.
I think I always had an equal amount of procrastinating to homework. I only did homework, unless i had a test the next day which would usually mean 20 mins study. i stopped doing homework 2months before the exams and only did study.

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[quote name='EconSurvivor' post='28925' date='Nov 24 2008, 08:27 PM']As a matter of interest, what do 7 (41-45/45) IB students when they're not at school?[/quote]

Chill :P

Nah, at the moment I'm quite busy with university applications. I make sure to finish the homework that is due the next day, unless it is extremely pointless or it won't be checked. Then comes the usual stuff... Facebook, MSN, etc. :)

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[quote name='EconSurvivor' post='28925' date='Nov 24 2008, 11:27 AM']As a matter of interest, what do 7 (41-45/45) IB students when they're not at school? What is/was their daily routine; How much did they procrastinate everyday? How long did they work in one stretch? When do they start and stop working? What time frame is reserved for home work, and what for studying? Do they just combine the 2 and save time? How much do they mess around with friends? etc..

7 students, give me some inspiration.
:P [/quote]
The question is what [i]don't[/i] 7 students do at home. And the answer to that is that we don't leave. I don't have a job or any major hobbies at the moment, save getting exercise and CAS hours, and I don't go out as much as I did in grade 11. If I get home at 5 from school and then go out running, come back, eat dinner, then it's around six thirty, where I've got 4 and a half hours straight, where I can go one hour with home work, and then one hour of slacking off, going on facebook, or whatever. The big way to get the good marks is to work hard in class, and to stay at school as long as possible, since the temptation to slack off is lessened. I usually spend my lunch breaks in the math room doing calculus problems, that ends up being six out of class hours a week of homework without costing any time at home. Combine that with a couple hours a day on weekends and you're doing sixteen hours of HL math a week, and totally not feeling the weight of it, because only four of them are in your own home. But yeah, there's my strategy for math, any other course can be crammed for, so no need to set up a schedule for it.

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It really depends on the student. I don't do anything (literally!), we don't really get homework, except in Physics and I never do it (although for Physics I should :P ). The real key to getting a 7 is knowing the right way to answer in tests. It should, however, go without saying that before tests I study on the night before (unless it's a language test) :) .

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