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Sisfat or Transfat

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Hello

I want to do an exdended essay about whether food contains sis- or transfat. But yet I don't have any idea how to determine it. Could you please help me?



Thank you for all answers

Cheers

Alfabeta

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[quote name='Alfabeta' post='29715' date='Dec 5 2008, 07:31 AM']Hello

I want to do an exdended essay about whether food contains sis- or transfat. But yet I don't have any idea how to determine it. Could you please help me?



Thank you for all answers

Cheers

Alfabeta[/quote]

I would ask your EE advisor. They would have a good grasp as to what lab equipment is available, etc.

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Uhm.. well cis-fats are naturally ocurring while trans-fats are artificially made (generally by hydrogenation). In other words, trans-fats are more saturated than cis-fats. You could carry out a bromine test for unsaturation measuring the volume of Bromine that is used in each case. In the case of cis-fats, the red-brown colour of bromine will rapidly change to colourless as it is added to the chain (more volume of bromine will be required). On the contrary, trans-fats will require less volume (they might be fully saturated though) of Bromine. Fats that "accept" more bromine before it stops changng from red-brown to colourless are cis-fats. (Check this information with your tutor please!).
Note: Trans-fats can occur naturally as in animal fats. Edited by Hedron123

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[quote name='Hedron123' post='29761' date='Dec 6 2008, 12:03 AM']Uhm.. well cis-fats are naturally ocurring while trans-fats are artificially made (generally by hydrogenation). In other words, trans-fats are more saturated than cis-fats. You could carry out a bromine test for unsaturation measuring the volume of Bromine that is used in each case. In the case of cis-fats, the red-brown colour of bromine will rapidly change to colourless as it is added to the chain (more volume of bromine will be required). On the contrary, trans-fats will require less volume (they might be fully saturated though) of Bromine. Fats that "accept" more bromine before it stops changng from red-brown to colourless are cis-fats. (Check this information with your tutor please!).
Note: Trans-fats can occur naturally as in animal fats.[/quote]



Thank you so very much. What do you guys think of having this as an extended essay?

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I think it's good though you will have to confirm what I have told you with your teacher. However, you will have to think up of a RQ that is appropriate for the experiments you want to carry out. I can't think of any right now.

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