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English A1 - Hamlet

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Question: what are some key passages from Hamlet that are 40 lines or longer?

By 'key' I mean, major/extended metaphors, turning points in the plot, offering insight or key theme, etc.

Any help is much appreciated..

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pretty obvious, but the soliloqueys are all offer viewpoints that offer insight into both the characters and to the plot in general. "To be or not to be" is a pretty good one to work with; offering a lot about Hamlet's character and his philosophies. Not to mention that this is easily the most discussed passage from the play; if you needed additional help, it'd be easy to google search "To be or not to be" and look at some other sample essays or literary evaluations. I also wouldn't be surprised if the passage is also reviewed by both sparknotes and cliffnotes.

the point where Ophelia runs out mad would be a good section to work with as well. It'd be pretty easy to compare and contrast how Ophelia was pre-murder to post-murder or to prove the point of one of the many themes in Hamlet (depending on your paper, of course). Even if you don't focus on Ophelia, you can look at how Gertrude handles the situation and how she acts after Ophelia's death.

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pretty obvious, but the soliloqueys are all offer viewpoints that offer insight into both the characters and to the plot in general.

That's what I thought :P I spent how many hours studying Hamlet's soliloquys? But no, apparently out of the 5 Hamlet passages 3 were DIALOGUES... -mumbles-

Thanks anyway.

Edited by eblake

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Apparently the IB oral passages from Hamlet are all dialogues, no soliloquies.

For example, you might get Claudius' first speech to the court, or Gertrude's description of Ophelia's death along with the reactions of Laertes and Claudius.

Practise with soliloquies, by all means -- but from what our teachers have told us, you will not have the chance to comment on a soliloquy in the oral.

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Apparently the IB oral passages from Hamlet are all dialogues, no soliloquies.

For example, you might get Claudius' first speech to the court, or Gertrude's description of Ophelia's death along with the reactions of Laertes and Claudius.

Practise with soliloquies, by all means -- but from what our teachers have told us, you will not have the chance to comment on a soliloquy in the oral.

The teacher chooses the passages, not the IB. My teacher chose to include a few soliloquies. The procedure is that the school chooses the passages, and sends the line numbers to the IBO.

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Dialogues?

One of the most important ones is where Hamlet is talking to the grave digger.

Some other ones where he manipulates language/pokes fun at Claudius in their interactions and the conversation between Hamlet and his mother, no?

Monologues/Soliloquies?

I think one of the most important would be Caludius' attempt at prayer.

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The teacher chooses the passages, not the IB. My teacher chose to include a few soliloquies. The procedure is that the school chooses the passages, and sends the line numbers to the IBO.

Ah, that'll be how they know then. :P

It's odd though, our teachers made it sound as though it was a decision made by IB to stop giving soliloquies because it was easy to find analysis on them in books by professionals, and students weren't giving their own interpretation. But perhaps one of the IB representatives recommended it at a meeting.

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Last year, the To Be Or Not To Be soliloquy was chosen, so yes, soliloquies can be chosen (depending on the school). Pretty nasty choice, imo, since that particular speech is so overdone.

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In Act I, not sure which scene, Hamlet's first soliloquy, where he explains his hate towards his mother's marriage with Claudius and speaks about how much greater his father was in comparison to Claudius. Being the first soliloquy it offers a lot of insight on Hamlet's feelings and what gives a lot of background on what has occurred. It is also filled with metaphors and comparisons, particularly to figures from greek mythology.

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I myself think that the extract where Claudauis tries to feel sorry for Ophelia and actually finds the irony of the situation of which LAertis is going to try to kill him because people have being telling Laertis that the King killed Polonuis to be a really good extract

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Here is a document from my teacher containing the passages that my class will need to learn in depth for our oral commentaries.

Hope it helps.

There is a soliloquy of King Claudius that i did a written commentary on if you would like my help?

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Hi everyone. I think that it is really interesting to discuss the ""Hidden" and "obvious" espionage" that exists in "Hamlet". We can find obvious and hidden "spiers" in Hamlet. Words "obvious" and "spying" are not really connected but In this tragedy Hamlet's madness can be treated as a way of obvious espionage. Paying attention on this I found so many brilliant ideas that I hadn't thought before. I didn't choose this topic so it is free and ready to be deeply discussed by anyone. 

HOPE IT WAS INTERESTING :)

 

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