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Biology Syllabus Statement 7.4.3

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Hey,

preparation for an upcoming test made me realize that syllabus statement 7.4.3 in the 2009 syllabus actually reads "State that translation consists of initiation, elongation, translocation and termination"; however, in class we only learned about initiation, elongation and termination. In addition, neither textbook I have (IBID, the IB Study Guide and Cleggs) mentions translocation. Is this a mistake in the syllabus or has anyone else who takes Biology HL learned about translocation in regard to translation?

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[quote name='Heinemann HL Bio book. P.205 (Topic 7.4 Nucleic Acids and Proteins-Translation)']The translocation phase:
The translocation phase actually happens during the elongation phase. Translocation involves the movement of the tRNAs from one site of the mRNA to another. First, a tRNA binds with the A site. Its amino acid is then added to the growing polypeptide chain by a peptide bond. This causes the polypeptide chain to be attached to the tRNA at the A site. The tRNA then moves to the P site. It transfers its polypeptide chain to the new tRNA that moves into the now exposed A site. Now the empty tRNA is transferred to the E site where it is released. This process occurs in the 5' to 3' direction. Therefore, the ribosomal complex is moving along the mRNA toward the 3' end. Remember, the start codon was near the 5' end of the mRNA.[/quote]


Hope that helps. If you have any questions or need further explanation, feel free to ask. I understand this topic pretty well. :P

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Ah ok, I understand! I knew what happens with the tRNA's, but I didn't know this process is referred to as translocation. Thanks so much, Rebecca :P

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well I just want to say is that I use Cleggs and IBID , and Oxford study guide, and that IBID is a reallly good book specially for HL it gives you bulleted points which is more helpfull when you study whenever i study for a quiz or anything i refer to IBID (IB In Detail) using points is much better than a block paragraph of words!

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Quick question: Where did you get the syllabus statements from? Are we supposed to have it? Or is it something you buy or get on the intetnet?
And yea, we only talked about initiation, elongation and termination in class too.

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[quote name='IBdoc' post='30117' date='Dec 11 2008, 05:11 PM']Quick question: Where did you get the syllabus statements from?[/quote]

My teacher printed the statements out for us, but you can get the syllabus online around here.

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[quote name='dexter' post='30116' date='Dec 11 2008, 10:48 AM']well I just want to say is that I use Cleggs and IBID , and Oxford study guide, and that IBID is a reallly good book specially for HL it gives you bulleted points which is more helpfull when you study whenever i study for a quiz or anything i refer to IBID (IB In Detail) using points is much better than a block paragraph of words![/quote]

The Heinemann has bulleted points too, but if you think the that the Heinemann is verbose from what you have seen, you should try looking at the Campbell Reece AP Biology Textbook... Its way worse about it. I got the Heinemann recently and I :P it. It is organized by the IB syllabus, is in full color and has many great diagrams. I have not used the IBID although it sounds useful, and I'm sure it has many of the same features. I'll check it out.

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