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Help: Physics EE on Efficiency of magnetic levitation in different temperatures

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Hi,

I'm doing my extended essay in physics and I wanted some feedback on my topic.

So the research question I'm thinking of is: To what extent does temperature impact the efficiency of a magnetic levitation device?

This isn't the final wording (I need to rephrase "magnetic levitation device"), but the basic idea is that I would build a kind of quadcopter using rotating magnets and a copper plate. The eddy currents in the plate would cause it to heat up and I want to see if cooling the plate would have any effect on how much weight the quadcopter could hold. I got the idea from the video below.

I think it has real world applications in things like maglev trains and such. Is this a good topic? I'm open to any suggestions anyone can offer. 

 

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This is slightly unnecessary for an IA, but it's not bad. The topic should be phrased as investigating temperature-dependence of a certain phenomena/effect/law, not of a device. You should probably identify the specific type(s) of induced magnetic field from current. It's more important that you understand and explain the theory rather than build something from a YouTube video.

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Thank you for the advice! 

As for the temperature dependence of phenomena/effect/law vs of a device, the reason I wanted to do the levitation thing was because this is for an extended essay. I thought the physics EE had to be more than just an IA. 

 

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EE, yeah. You should still identify the theory in the topic instead of focus on a device in general. Building a device is unnecessary for EE too but it's not a bad idea.

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Okay, thank you. I'll rephrase to something like: "To what extent does temperature impact the efficiency of an induced magnetic field as described by Faraday's Law.

Hopefully that focuses more on the theory. 

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