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Hello,

This is my first post, I was just seeing if I could use this website as a way to reach out to some people who may be better suited for thinking in terms of IA's. My chemistry IA idea is currently about the corrosiveness rate of acid rain at different temperatures. I'm trying to extend my topic beyond the scope of the class and see maybe what applications different building materials could have in different regions based on its rain's acidity.

I want to have 3 acids made aqueous, HNO2, HNO3, and H2SO4 tested on 3 or 5 different temperatures. I want to do room temperature (~70 degrees F) and 1 or 2 above and below using an ice bath and hot plate (possibly 5 to try and make a graph to interpolate other temperatures between them). The building materials I want are limestone (since it's easy and the most well-known victim of acid rain), steel, and copper as they are common, multi-purpose building materials. 

The thing is that I am investigating specifically the relative corrosiveness of each acid on the material. Mostly comparing the % change between temps as the acid/material stay the same (H2SO4 on limestone has x rate of corrosion at room temp, does that increase to 1.15x should the temperature go up or 0.85x if it decreases?) and comparing those percentages or relative changes between acids.

The main issue I have is with the different molarities/concentrations of acid that I should use. I know that the metals will be less reactive than the limestone and that it will show results much quicker than either copper or steel. However, I want to bump up the concentration/molarity so that I don't have to sit forever and watch steel sit in an acidic solution, eroding too slowly for me to see. Also, I've been scouring and I cannot find anything about where to even start with concentrations for anything other than limestone if anyone has any resources about the corrosion rate of steel/copper in acid rain.

Thanks y'all

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Acid corrosion is an oxidation reaction, whose spontaneity is predicted by electrochemical series, but rate is mostly empirically measured. Most videos I've found have time elapse over couple hours, so I guess you can try just record it and go to class.

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