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I just started my junior year and officially started the IB program, and is it really worth it? Is the pain I have gone through the past couple of years and in the coming years going to help me get into a good college? Will it help me get a secure job? Will I actually be a well-rounded person?

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1. Depends on the person. I honestly believe for at least a third of the people taking the IB, it's just not worth it. 

2. Not more so than AP/A-Levels. You need to realize you're going to have to work very hard for intangible goals -- the IB is an opportunity to develop a holistic skill and mindset that could serve you very well in your college and professional careers if you let it, but it won't necessarily get you into better colleges/programs/get you higher grades in college. 

3. Unnecessary for securing a job, but the critical thinking skills you develop through the IB can make for more expansive outlooks in the future.

4. To an extent. You'll definitely be more well-rounded than if you were only an AP/A-Levels student focusing on a certain area e.g. STEM/Humanities/Arts.

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look, i do regret taking it, and i do regret not studying harder when i knew that i have serious exam stress and that im not really that smart IB student that everyone is. if you want to take the IB programme one thing i can tell you is that you can always retake your exams, remark them, and get a higher point average. you get alot of experience from the IB programme, but if you don't get the diploma you can't get anywhere. so taking IB is a risk. you just need to know how to handle it before it gets all crowded and you might be behind, you have to make sure that if you are behind by just a short distance, sprint. make sure you sprint. but yeah the friends you make through the IB programme are those who will last with you prob a long time as they are in the same hell as you. enjoy the two years. and dont worry about getting a job now, worry about passing and getting the diploma after that everything will be fine. the IB diploma is recognized in the majority of places, you will be fine. 

Edited by hk18

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IB is only as much as what you make out of it. And by that, I mean to say that it is only a tool that you can use to better yourself. Whether or not you use that tool effectively is up to you, and how you make use of the program. If you don't put in the effort, IB will not do anything for you and might even have negative effects, especially in the self-esteem and mental health areas (since everyone's really smart and there's a lot of stress to do well). If you do put in lots of effort, IB can really help you to improve your work habits and broaden your horizons, so I do think that there can also be huge benefits. 

Tl;dr: IB is a double edged sword. Only do it if you're prepared to put in a lot of time and effort into it.

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On 8/25/2018 at 1:54 AM, bella_zinger said:

I just started my junior year and officially started the IB program, and is it really worth it? Is the pain I have gone through the past couple of years and in the coming years going to help me get into a good college? Will it help me get a secure job? Will I actually be a well-rounded person?

 

1. Yes, I think so.  Its education is quite university-style and self-driven, so by the time you get to college, you will be well-prepared.  That does mean you suffer more now, though.

2. Depends on whether the colleges you want to apply to will value the IB more than the alternative.  I don't know what the consensus is in the US, but in Australia, doing the IB is a massive advantage.  Lots of unis offer early-entry schemes and the scaling to an ATAR is very favourable.

3. Not directly, but it might help you get into a better college or course (and get better marks in said college or course), which might help you to get a secure job.

4. Honestly, once you get to uni, being an all-arounder doesn't matter at all, because you'll instantly specialise in something.  I went to uni, took politics and languages, and haven't touched maths or chemistry since the November 2016 exams.  In high school you will learn to be an all-arounder, but at uni it doesn't matter at all!

It's worth at least giving the IB a go.  I very much enjoyed its focus on independence, engagement with content, and research into personal interests for the IAs.  Sure, it's hard, but all college prep programmes are hard!

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