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How difficult is to write a Maths EE?

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If math is your hands-down definitive best subject, then it's doable to get an A. Keep in mind that C is the average grade across all subjects. Basically if you have always been 1-2 years ahead in math than your peers, or are able to pick up math quicker than the others than Math EE can be an option. You want to first read the Math chapter in the EE guide, understand the criteria, and brainstorm on some possible topics. Keep your options open and find topics in other subjects as well.

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1 hour ago, kw0573 said:

If math is your hands-down definitive best subject, then it's doable to get an A. Keep in mind that C is the average grade across all subjects. Basically if you have always been 1-2 years ahead in math than your peers, or are able to pick up math quicker than the others than Math EE can be an option. You want to first read the Math chapter in the EE guide, understand the criteria, and brainstorm on some possible topics. Keep your options open and find topics in other subjects as well.

Hey thx for the reply,

I was actually thinking about this research question: "How does the Schrodinger's equation preserve its normalization?"

Now the concepts and theories in this questions heavily relate to physics and in-fact the question stated above was my RQ for my EE of physics, the subject I initially chose to work. Unfortunately, my teacher, when I presented my RQ to him today, he said that the RQ was way to theoretical and that IB considers theoretical essays, that solely rely on secondary data and not consider any experiments, to be ugly (hence a connotation for IB giving me a C or even less). So me taking my teachers advice that he switching my entire EE subject to maths, and focus on the mathematical reasoning behind how the equation's unitary functions preserve it's inner products, therefore keep the SE equation normalized at all times. 

I don't know if you understand QM... but it seems like you have pretty good experience with IB maths. If do understand QM, is it cool if we continue the conversation in depth and I share my EE structure, and hear u're thoughts??

 

 

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I don't understand QM but I have taken a 4th year university level chemistry course in it. I don't want to offer so much help somehow my role overshadows that of a supervisor. The wave's normalization is preserved but that's not the most interesting mathematical aspect out of SE. Certainly the core maths are in the eigenvalues, the orthogonality, and the differential equations. 

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7 hours ago, kw0573 said:

I don't understand QM but I have taken a 4th year university level chemistry course in it. I don't want to offer so much help somehow my role overshadows that of a supervisor. The wave's normalization is preserved but that's not the most interesting mathematical aspect out of SE. Certainly the core maths are in the eigenvalues, the orthogonality, and the differential equations. 

Hey, 

I just looked at the EE guide and found that we could use secondary data and the candidate may very well get a high grade for the theoretical physics EE

From guide it says:

"Students can choose to answer their research question with an essay based solely on theory or one based on data and theory."

"Student using data elsewhere can assess all assessment criteria and achieve the highest marks"

So what do you think... is the explanation of the SE preserving it's norm a more mathematical based EE or physics based. I understand if I consider a mathematical basis of this question I would have to go pretty deep into complex mathematics such as eigenvectors, vector calculus and as an IB student it way over me and I probably won't have time to even study them individually for my essay. Whilst the physics I may make use of my calculus and highs school mathematics and merge them with explaining the physics behind the norm of particle in a box and how it stays normalized with of time

 

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I am not familiar with a science EE, so I can't offer much help. Sorry :dizzy: I am not sure what data you'll be using??? Like basically for SE you choose a potential function and you solve it mathematically, so it's more challenging to show personal engagement in physics than it is in math. 

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18 minutes ago, kw0573 said:

I am not familiar with a science EE, so I can't offer much help. Sorry :dizzy: I am not sure what data you'll be using??? Like basically for SE you choose a potential function and you solve it mathematically, so it's more challenging to show personal engagement in physics than it is in math. 

 

Essentially I was thinking of this structure for my essay: 

- A consider a particular function with a normalization condition 

- Then I would evolve the function in time and show that it is normalized for all time

- With that out of the way... I would explain why the SE stays normalized and here I dicuss the mathematical propertise of SE and it's unitary functions; time evolution. Essentially researching what gives away to the preservation of the wavefunction. 

I understand the explanation is more mathematical than physics, but what I really fear is writing a maths EE with complex mathematical explanations. 

Infact, do you need complex mathematics such as vector calculus and eigenvectors to make my EE good for A or at-least a B, what exactly are the examiners looking for? 

Or I'm I good explaining the whole preservation thing with some IB calculus and some-what uni-level mathematics?

Edited by Kil- STRO

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Quality of math only worth 30%. The guide will say what examiners are looking for. The math behind normalization is straightforward. The down side is that it's hard to show personal engagement regardless math or physics. You are doing a lot of explaining, but not much original content.

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5 hours ago, kw0573 said:

Quality of math only worth 30%. The guide will say what examiners are looking for. The math behind normalization is straightforward. The down side is that it's hard to show personal engagement regardless math or physics. You are doing a lot of explaining, but not much original content.

 

I not necessarily working out normalization of a particular wave-function, and just explaining the normalization , but my EE as I have mentioned before is explaining HOW the unitary operator (time evolution) of the SE work to preserve the inner products of the function thus preserving the SE's norm for all times. I don't really know how much of a mathematical explaining I have got to do for this.. but the actual explaining of the mathematical operator of SE, I guess gives it away.

I don't really understand what you really mean by personal engagement (is it to show how enthusiastic am I about the topic, idk I hope you can explain)

like you menstioned about "not much original content" .... ofcourse in the guide it say that restating secondary research or not giving any personal research at all is not good for a "good enough grade".

I think by personal engagement you mean... when some himself/herself do some personal research (correct me if I am wrong), but to me undestanding why the SE stay or not stay normalized over a period of time seems quite intriguing and I literally don't have a clue about how to answer and approach my RQ as stated at the very beginning. Although the answer to the RQ is pretty well know to the scientific community... to me it's just a black canvas. So, could me myself actually trying to learn, deciphering and demonstrating my understanding be the reason behind the preservation be a personal engagement???

Again I want to appreciate the awesome help you're providing me with and helping me understand the whole situation. 

😁😁😀 U're the BEST!

Edited by Kil- STRO

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I said personal engagement because that's the phrase in the HL IA and I thought you might recognize it. So out of 34 points in the EE, 12 is critical thinking and 6 is engagement. Critical thinking is taking what you know, and combine the ideas to infer about additional facts. Engagement is based on the reflection form in which you discuss the research process and any obstacles. 

Again I don't know exactly what you are trying to do (mostly because I don't understand QM very well) but it sounds like a complicated version of the distributive (or associative?) property. It's not that hamiltonian preserves the magnitude, it's that by taking the hamiltonian, the wave magnitude change, so you add a reciprocal pre-factor (coefficient) to "cancel" what the operator did. Say the operator does (× 5), then in the wave function you might add a coefficient of 1/5, so the two operations cancel each out to maintain the same wave integral over space and time.

I think learning basic vectors and complex numbers are a must, so it could be easier to relate eigenvalues/eigenvectors to HL than some of the other topics. 

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18 hours ago, kw0573 said:

I said personal engagement because that's the phrase in the HL IA and I thought you might recognize it. So out of 34 points in the EE, 12 is critical thinking and 6 is engagement. Critical thinking is taking what you know, and combine the ideas to infer about additional facts. Engagement is based on the reflection form in which you discuss the research process and any obstacles. 

Again I don't know exactly what you are trying to do (mostly because I don't understand QM very well) but it sounds like a complicated version of the distributive (or associative?) property. It's not that hamiltonian preserves the magnitude, it's that by taking the hamiltonian, the wave magnitude change, so you add a reciprocal pre-factor (coefficient) to "cancel" what the operator did. Say the operator does (× 5), then in the wave function you might add a coefficient of 1/5, so the two operations cancel each out to maintain the same wave integral over space and time.

I think learning basic vectors and complex numbers are a must, so it could be easier to relate eigenvalues/eigenvectors to HL than some of the other topics. 

Hey I just read the guide... it say IB discourages student from taking topics, that are too complicated. Do you think, my topic is way to complicated for a Maths EE?

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I like to first correct something I said in the last post

The magnitude of the wave function is chosen so that ∫ψ* • ψ dτ = 1, and changes of applying the hamiltonian and potential functions are stored in the eigenvalue. So what you had before is right

No I didn't think this topic is very complicated for a Year 1 student, but you need to make that decision!

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2 minutes ago, kw0573 said:

I like to first correct something I said in the last post

The magnitude of the wave function is chosen so that ∫ψ* • ψ dτ = 1, and changes of applying the hamiltonian and potential functions are stored in the eigenvalue. So what you had before is right

No I didn't think this topic is very complicated for a Year 1 student, but you need to make that decision!

Well I since, I am quite interested in the topic and I did do prior research on normalization before DP1 and in-fact did my Grade 10 personal project on Schrodinger's equation. I guess for my EE, I might as well take it further by talking about the intricate mathematics of the equation.   

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