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Hi I am an IB student in Hong Kong and is an Australian Citizen.

I want to apply to Australia Universities next year as an undergraduate local student.

I am confused with the system that Universities (which offer Medicine) operates.

Some universities offer MBBS as a postgraduate (Syndey) and some as undergraduate (UNSW) and some you have to study an undergraduate course in thier university before studying a postgraduate course in Medicine in their school.

I don't know which universities operates on which system. I mean in the third example, if i take a undergraduate course prior to a postgraduate Medical course, would i have to study for a longer duration as a result?

And also is there some ranking on the Medical Universities in Australia which i can refer to?

Thank you so much!

Regards,

Andy

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From what I heard some universities offer 6 year medical degrees which is an undergraduate one (these have higher requirements for entry). Others such as Melbourne offer a 4 year post graduate degree (you would have to do a 3/4 year undergraduate degree before that making the total duration 7 or 8 years).

Some well ranked ones are Melbourne, Monash, UNSW, UQueensland.

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well i'm situated in Brisbane so i'll give you a heads up on what i know about the uni's here

UQ: MBBS - 4 years fulltime

undergrad: year 12 provisional entry

selection criteria - UMAT, OP1 or equiv.

grad:

selection criteria - bachelor degree or higher w/ minimum GPA of 5, GAMSAT

MONASH: MBBS

undergrad - 5 years full time

selection criteria -(look at IB prereq below) , umat

IB prereq - eng and chem at a minimum of 5 at SL or 4 at HL

grad - 4 years full time

selection criteria - just says GAMSAT, interview :P

PM me if you want info for griffith uni as well, hope this will help you somehow :(

oh and in relation to your question, basically undergrad means you've just graduated and will be entering your 1st year of uni, postgrad means that you've done a degree beforehand

so yes, if you want to enter a post grad course you need to complete a degree beforehand...if that makes sense at all

Edited by Chelleee

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Does the country of your study determine where you work?

I'm planning to apply to both HK and Australia universities for MBBS.

I'm aware that there are certain geographical limitations in where one wants to practice medicine if they obtain the degree in the UK e.g. they can only work in the UK and Europe

If i graduate from HK with MBBS, will i only be able to work in HK? (or are there other places at which i can work)

Likewise, if i graduate in Australia, will i be able to practice in HK?

Thank you so much!

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Usually, a medical licence allows you to practice within the country that issues it to you. If you were to get a MBBS from HK, you'd have to pass the exams in Australia or anywhere else in the world where you would like to practice medicine.

Even if you did get a MBBS in Germany for instance, you would still have to pass some sort of certification to practice in the UK.

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Hi I'm a Year 12 Student doing IB in Hong Kong and i'm a domestic student.

I will be applying for MBBS in Australia in 2011.

I am aware that some universities offer undergraduate MBBS (UNSW, Monash, UWA) whilst some universities only offer "graduate" MBBS (ANU, USyd, UMelb).

Most undergraduate MBBS courses would take 5 years to complete (including honours 6 years)

If i want to study in a university that offer postgraduate MBBS because i prefer the reputation of that institute , i'd have to do an undergraduate course (e.g. Medical Science) and then do gradute MBBS. By taking this path, would i end up studying longer? (3 years + 4 years = 7 years)

Why do some universities offer graduate MBBS?

What is the advantage/disadvantage of doing undergraduate/graduate MBBS.

__________________________________________________ ________

And also, my predicted grade is around 36 now but i aim to get 39-41 in the finals, is it safe to say i can use some of Aus Universities as a "safety", or are most University Medical Schools in Australia equally competitive, what grade range should i aim to get to stand a good chance for a place?

Thank you all so much!

Andy

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You might already know, but if you wish to enter undergrad (and sometimes post) MBBS in NSW, you will need to sit the UMAT (Undergraduate Medicine and Health Sciences Admissions Test). You do not, however, need to sit the UMAT for the University of Sydney. There are 30 spots open for undergrad MBBS triple degree studies (ie. (music/science/medical science) and Medicine and Surgery)without UMAT's for 7 years at sydney uni (with an ATAR of 99.95). Know that graduate medecine at sydney uni is the hardest of the university courses to enter. It is easier to enter into a science or medical science degree at the uni so that you can transfer into the MBBS if you keep a distinction average. The University of NSW (which is the second best for science) is almost as difficult to get into. Both universities have recently acquired new cancer investigation laboratories. I would then consider UTS for medecine, but you have pretty much exhausted the best medecine universities in the area. Try Necastle uni. There is also a rather renown medecine university in WA.

Anyway, I am not very helpful, but I recommend you call the Medecine faculties of the Universities NOW to make sure that your current qualifications are compatible with the Medicine courses of the Universities and that you are doing everything to prepare yourself at this point for easy acceptance into Australian Universities.

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Please try to keep all your questions about the same subject in the same topic instead of opening new ones. It makes it easier for people answering you to know what has already been said.

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