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School Student Councils?

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I know that pretty much every school has them (well, at least where I live) but my point is has anyone here ever run for a position? Do you have any advice for someone who wants to run for council? I don't really have a fear of public speaking or anything like that, so that's not really a problem for me.

Thanks guys :D

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Firstly I'd find out if anybody wants to be on the council or not - at some schools student council is a big thing, and at other schools the person who gets to be on the council is the person who was last to run out of the room/vote other people in (for instance I got voted in once because I was the only person still on holiday for the first day or term) :D You can save some face by being extremely discreet about electing yourself if it's the latter sort!

If it's a serious thing, you should do more or less what anybody does for anything where they want to be elected as a rep. Find out what people have problems with and say you'll bring them up in student council meetings. Like if there's not enough chocolate for sale at breaktimes, or if there's not enough stuff being recycled (the people in charge of your school finances/marketing will absolutely love "green" ideas) etc etc. that's the right kind of thing to go for. Similarly "community" things, like discos, socials, cake sales, book weeks and so on tend to hit it off with the general population. You should basically just say you're going to fight for whatever people complain about/want the most. Then obviously it's also kinda a popularity contest [if you go to the first sort of school!], so make lots of friends :) If people know you from sports teams, or having just been very talkative and opinionated in lessons etc., that's the sort of person they tend to vote in - so if you don't speak up much, you should make sure your classmates realise you're cool with being loud and getting your point (aka their points, of course ;D) across to the establishment, and they'll probably vote you in if you let them know you want to do it.

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Hey!

Ok thats a topic for me :D. I've been running a student council for 4 years and been a vice president for a year now in second school. It isn't hard or anything, just come up with good ideas and be cool. Although don't forget the formal side of it.

About tips to get in it.. Well first, if there is voting you should make a sort of introductory speech which consists of your plans, your past experience and all that stuff usually in elective speeches. And then its up to voters if you get in or not...

If there isn't voting just go and ask if you can join and when gathering more expirience in things work you'll know yourself what to do.

I hope it helped.

If you need any help on that issue ask any time!

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I was Student Council President in IB1 for 2 reasons: a) The school has a policy that only juniors (so IB1 students) can be in the senior student council positions because IB2 students have too much work, and b) No one else wanted to be president. There wasn't a run-off for any of the positions, but they still made me get up and give a speech about what I was going to do. I said I'd do stuff for the middle school, because they always got neglected. The year before there was a run-off for the position of vice-president between 2 people, and the guy that made the emotive speech ("This has been my dream since childhood, I love this school and have been here for 13 years, blah blah") won. His speech was quite cheesy though. You should try inject some humour in your speech though (remark on something that everyone knows and finds funny, like a memorable incident (e.g. when an inspector came to school and tried to put something in the trash, only to find there were no trash cans) and use that to highlight an issue that needs to be improved, and what you will do about it). People won't vote you in if you're seen as taking yourself too seriously. But don't make the whole thing out to be a joke either. Show them that you're fun, easy-going, but serious about putting some issues right in yoru school.

Make posters with catchy slogans and funny pictures. Most people just out "Vote for me!" and leave it at that. Not very original. And don't be the person that gives out free candy in halls to those who will vote for them. Your school may have a policy against this, and you may be accused of cheating by the person/people you're running against.

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Hi! Well, how to get in really depends on what role the student council plays in your school, and what the rules and regulation of your school are.

In my school the student council is formed by 16 students (12 from ib1 and 4 vice captains from igcse1). We honestly play a major role in the school life of our student body and can take our roles to another level because our director and principal allow us that kind of freedom. Hence, our campaigning and elections that take place during one week in January are a huge huge thing. Posters and other sorts of things are put up everywhere, speeches are given, some people get sweets, pencils, etc I don't know if that´s the case in your school, but I´ll let you know what has been the most successful campaigning strategies:

a)make sure people know you before the elections take place - get involved in school activities

b) come up with unique ideas - two years back, someone got a massive banner that hung from the second floor and said ´vote for ....´and last year i made door hangers and hung them all over the school

c) don't waste your time and money trying to bribe them ONLY through sweets and pencils, make sure they know what changes you are going to bring and WHY they should elect you

d) your speech should be clear and concise, show you are confident but also that you are cool and caring (i think a combination of the last two qualities is what students look for)

e) from each year group, make sure that a well known and popular student campaigns for you - but because he/she genuinely wants you to win, or else it doesn't really work.(if you get this point right, chances of you winning are sky high)

f) make sure you don't do negative campaigning. Nobody wants to vote for losers.

And that´s about it I think. No matter what happens, remember that being part of the student council means putting in a lot of hard work. If you get elected - be responsible and fulfill your duties! If you are not - oh lucky you, you are one step closer to passing the IB with better grades, because the student council consumes a lot of your time!

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One idea that got a girl get a Vice President's seat when everyone thought that another dude was gonna win is:

1) Don't be too formal

2) Act as if you care about the students and sit on the floor with them [if they make you sit on floors like our school

3) Don't come with any papers, just remember your main points and work on from there [even though this is hard for a lot of people]

4) Don't bash your opponents

Since your Arab, like me, this might work: Our school banned us from wearing Palestinian scarves for political reasons. During his speech he walked off the stage and said: "I don't care what the school thinks of these *takes out scarf* and battle cries: These Are Our Brothers [ This is Sparta type of voice]"

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Thanks for all your help guys. I'm not too sure about the Sparta voice though, haha. If I'm brave I might give it a go!!!

Unfortunately, I don't have too much experience, but I've been in my school a while and know most of the people there as friends. Hopefully, I'll do well enough!

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Thanks for all your help guys. I'm not too sure about the Sparta voice though, haha. If I'm brave I might give it a go!!!

Unfortunately, I don't have too much experience, but I've been in my school a while and know most of the people there as friends. Hopefully, I'll do well enough!

Having lots of friends seems to be the decisive point with us Middle-Easterners as we tend to vote for people we know/are friends with. Good Luck

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Haha, I'll try my best. What I'm worried about is my speech. Last time I ran for council (a few years back), I decided it would be cooler if I memorized my speech, so I just didn't bring a paper with me. The next thing I knew I was stumbling over what I had to say, it was embarrassing! Now I'll make sure to read off a sheet, but make as much eye contact as possible. However, I do have a question: What type of speech should I be making? I mean, the people that tend to be funny and sociable usually win, so I guess I should reflect this in my speech???

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However, I do have a question: What type of speech should I be making? I mean, the people that tend to be funny and sociable usually win, so I guess I should reflect this in my speech???

If you are funny and sociable then yep, go for it in your speech. Everybody likes a laugh :) However, if you're not naturally funny, whatever you do, don't try and be funny unless you're 100% it's going to work. Basically maximise your strengths. If you're a serious sort of person, focus on making yourself out as serious, responsible, logical, clear-minded etc., because people also respect that. If you do have a good sense of humour and know people laugh at what you say, absolutely go for it, people love light hearted stuff -- just go for what suits you and reflects A) what sort of a person people think you are and B) what skills you genuinely do have. No point in pretending (possibly disastrously) anything else.

As a general rule, if you would have to go significantly out of your way to work out how to make your speech funny, it's probably not a style which particularly suits you. Anyway, as with everything uncertain, grab a friend and ask their advice.

What I would say is that the best speeches aren't memorised, aren't read and aren't concrete. People have bullet points, or even quite a detailed version of what they want to say, but use them only for backup. If you have your whole speech written out precisely as you want to say it, it comes across as stilted and (in my opinion having listened to them) juvenile that you can't think on your feet enough to make up a sentence. You want to connect with people in any speech you give throughout your life, so you have to find the level of paper-based support which is right for you to be able to go it solo. I personally like doing reasonably detailed quick sentences [on paper] of the basics of what I want to say as it basically takes all your nerves away - should something go wrong, you can always just look down and get it all right back again. Other people can cope with literally like 5 bullet points, but in my experience of doing that, that's too little and I find my attention split between trying to give my speech and worrying about whether I'll remember enough to say(!). After all, you want to be relaxed. Finally on the note of "not concrete", I also honestly feel that the best, most spontaneous speeches and also most communicative ones are the ones you've never practised. I mean, you're going to say it differently every time anyway, but if you make it into a conversation with the audience (after all you don't rehearse conversations!) it all flows much more smoothly, naturally and you'll find communication easier. At least all this works for me :D You do have to find what works for you, of course.

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As said here before, Student Council varies from school to school, not only just in seriousness but also in the way the school executes it. Some schools believe that the speeches are enough, but come voting time, many of the students have forgotten who said what and just vote for someone based on how cool their name is.

Make sure you scope out your competition and find a way to make yourself different. Read any possible guidelines that have been set (for example, at my school you're not allowed campaigning or giving out candy or dressing up) and make sure you do something that will allow people to remember you.

My absolute biggest advice is to be prepared for the worst, but hope for the best. I find that going in you think that you're prepared for the loss, but when it comes time and they make the big announcement, you start to convince yourself to calm down and that it's going to be you. I ran for student council the four years I was eligible and I got on every second year. If you lose, think about ways you can improve for next year.

Edited by Feist

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