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Food for thought!

  

17 members have voted

  1. 1. If you're giving the answers, you're _______ an exam?

    • sitting
      3
    • taking
      5
    • writing
      0
    • sitting or taking
      4
    • sitting or writing
      0
    • taking or writing
      1
    • could be any one of them
      1
    • I absolutely don't know and don't care
      3


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Okay :D

I keep seeing people around the forum saying that they're "writing" an exam which I first assumed was a mistake, then thought possibly they themselves were designing the papers, and finally have concluded that perhaps in some parts of the world, writing = answering. Of course I then reflected that this is misleading and makes very little sense as the exam is something happening to you, not you happening to it, unless you are indeed the designer. After further contemplation it occurred to me to think what I'd say (obviously the most correct verb of them all...) and decided I'd probably go for "sitting".

Alas this makes no real sense either - although it's not so misleading as to suggest the very opposite of what you want to say, it's also probably fair to admit nobody's sitting on their exam papers, at least not on a regular basis. Even "taking" the exam is venturing out into the realms of possible burglary.

So! This is a poll, and we're going to vote which of the verbs is the best/most acceptable and which of them isn't. Terrifically exciting, I say!! Well... actually I say "taking" or "sitting" and have a snobbish upper-middle-class view of "writing" as a word which simply makes far less sense than the other two. What do you say?

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I usually say that I have an exam, post exam I'd say that I had an exam. Possibly because an exam to me is the general atmosphere and surroundings which are tortuous and excruciatingly painful, rather than the paper full of mindless questions. That said, the most appropriate word to me would be 'doing/completing an exam'.

Every country has their own words to describe something really. Most people don't realise that the proper word for 'studying' a degree is 'reading' a degree.

You must be terribly bored to come up with this for a thread topic :D

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I thought this was going to be about food. Aw shuckss.

Aboo said, "Most people don't realise that the proper word for 'studying' a degree is 'reading' a degree." Care to explain to us? :D

Btw, I would say I'm getting a degree in such and such. And I think that "sitting" or "writing" exams sounds much more enjoyable than "taking" an exam. Maybe it's because I'm so used to taking them. Which is so passive in comparison to "writing" an exam. Sounds eccentric :D

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Aha, but would you sit, write, or TAKE a practical exam?! Or do?!!?!?!

**Five exclamation marks. The true sign of a man who goes around with his underpants on his head.**

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I voted for sitting! but sometimes I say take. It depends really :D definately not writing though. People who write the exams are the IB in my eyes :D

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I thought this was going to be about food. Aw shuckss.

Aboo said, "Most people don't realise that the proper word for 'studying' a degree is 'reading' a degree." Care to explain to us? :(

Btw, I would say I'm getting a degree in such and such. And I think that "sitting" or "writing" exams sounds much more enjoyable than "taking" an exam. Maybe it's because I'm so used to taking them. Which is so passive in comparison to "writing" an exam. Sounds eccentric :D

Traditionally everybody "read" their degrees because back then it was mostly about reading, I guess! :D You still say "reading" english, or "reading" history/any other degree today - especially if you're at Oxbridge where they probably invented it and have some weird obsession with absolute traditionalisms. Technically "reading" your degree is the correct verb. Indeed you are "sent up" to "read" your degree, and should you fail to do so adequately, you're "sent down". Actually Oxbridge is basically a goldmine if you like ye olde things - from Michelmas term to pennying drinks :D Unfortunately they can say these things because they probably invented them, so nobody can complain too hard and if you do they get very pompous and waffly, so it's best not to try! :(

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I was looking at one of my WL books, God of Small Things, and one of the characters who studied at Oxford told the twins that you don't go to Oxford, you read at it. And then after reading at Oxford, you come down haha. I like quirks =) until they become obnoxious, but whatever. They make people interesting.

I'd never heard of pennying before... interesting game haha. I'm fairly certain that I use 'interesting' so often that it's become a staple.

So if a student at Oxbridge were to purposely say that he/she was doing a degree in the humanities or anything, then would the individual receive scalding looks or something of the sort?

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So if a student at Oxbridge were to purposely say that he/she was doing a degree in the humanities or anything, then would the individual receive scalding looks or something of the sort?

Given that it's Oxbridge, I suspect somebody would notice immediately and harrumph pointedly yet in a subtle and polite way until the error had been corrected by its perpetrator, who would of course use their intelligence and similar pernickety nature to determine the root of the problem of their own accord :D

:D

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