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IB EXAMS - adult student

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Hi,

I'm a trainee-teacher considering doing an IB to familiarize himself with the system but also because I would like to train myself up in another subject (history) and think an IB might be a good place to start (for those that think this is crazy: I also need a Spanish qualification altho i speak it, could do the Chinese ab-initio, wouldn't mind doing Economics as that goes hand in hand with History and don't mind doing some Standard-level studying in some other subjects).

My question is this: could I do an IB diploma over 3/4 years (I've got to work!!) and pick and choose which modules I start with? Would I, for example, be able to finish the relevant Spanish and History modules in the first 12 months and then spread the rest over a few years?

I'd appreciate any advice and thanks to you in advance,

Dave

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Are you thinking of teaching yourself all of the material or attending class with students? I don't know about the technicalities of that. Have you tried contacting IBO?

You might want to look at this: http://ibo.org/diploma/development/dponline/index.cfm

And shoot them an email about your situation. They might force you to take all exams in a two year period, but you can always start studying earlier and start taking assessments after a year. Also, you don't have to do the EE, CAS hours, and other IB Diploma Program things if you only want certificates for certain subjects, like Spanish. You could take whichever subjects you wanted at certificate level where you don't have to complete the criteria for the IB Diploma, and the rigor of the courses you take wouldn't be affected.

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I'm pretty sure the answer to your question is no. Whilst the IB allow you to take a couple of exams early, after just one year of study, to spread the load for your second year, the program is rigidly at 2 years program and I don't think it is negotiable. To do an actual Diploma you also need to complete 150 hours of CAS activities, completed in a period of 2 years (which is why students can't count activities they did before they start IB as CAS).

What I can kind of imagine is to do 6 separate certificates, spread out over 3 years (a year for each set of 2 certificates) but I'm not sure even that would be possible.

Still, your best bet for accurate and up to date information would be to email IBO :). I'm purely making an educated guess.

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If you're a trainee-teacher, then you're too old to do IB program courses. The age limit is 19, and rather inflexible. Instead, you should probably look to do college or university courses; you'll find more options, and they'll actually let you take them.

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If you're a trainee-teacher, then you're too old to do IB program courses. The age limit is 19, and rather inflexible. Instead, you should probably look to do college or university courses; you'll find more options, and they'll actually let you take them.

Exactly what I was thinking; I do believe that there is indeed an age limit set for those who can take IB. What's your motivation behind it?

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Wasn't there blindpet on these forums, who was actually 23 or something and took the IB? I think it's recommended for 16-19 year olds but there's no upper age limit, there shouldn't be an upper age limit on education anyway.

The OP can always do certificates in History and Spanish if they wish so that they can get familiarised with the IB way of teaching and not actually do the entire diploma.

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There is no age limit, it's just designed for 16-19 year olds. You can do it even if you are 60 years old as long as you pay IBO.

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Hi Peaches,

Do all teachers do the IB to get familiar with the program - Certainly not! Most experienced teachers probably did another school curriculum (I did the South African curriculum, others did A-levels. Most people do the curriculum in their home country, and then go to a university or teachers' training college to train up to be a teacher.

I am comfortable teaching IB Business Studies and Economics as I have a Bachelor's degree in Commerce, and an MBA, along with my teaching qualification.

But as a teacher with plenty of teaching experience in commerce and computer sciences, I may be tempted to do the IB course simply to get to proper grips with the curriculum.

Although, most IB teachers (Perhaps all? I am not sure) have completed IB teacher training, whcih covers the requirements of the curriculum for their subject, coursework/internal assessment, the Extended Essay (in case their students choose an topi in their area of expertise), and the overall understanding of how IB fits together.

Hope this helps!

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